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Is Putin Still “Indispensable”?

Is Putin Still “Indispensable”?

Recent public opinion polls in Russia showed that an approval rating for the Russian President Vladimir Putin fell to its lowest level since December 2011, when thousands rallied against parliamentary election fraud, chanting “Putin should go.” In the meantime, the share of those who hold negative outlook of …

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Unlikely Change in Russia’s Stance on Syria

Unlikely Change in Russia’s Stance on Syria

 
As Russia vetoed a Western-backed UN resolution imposing non-military sanctions on Syria as “unilateral” and directed only against the regime, it once again demonstrated that its position on the Syrian crisis remains unchanged, emphasizing its split with the West. The repetitive pattern of the Kremlin’s refusal to pressure regime change …

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Kyrgyzstan: Uncertain Future of Manas Transit Center

Kyrgyzstan: Uncertain Future of Manas Transit Center

As NATO is looking for logistic ways to implement the concluded strategic partnership agreement with Afghanistan, which extends its participation in the region beyond pullout timeline of 2014, Kyrgyzstan regains leverage over Russia and the United States, considering it hosts military bases for both countries. However, this time Kyrgyz new …

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Eurasian Union – ‘Work in Progress’

Eurasian Union  – ‘Work in Progress’

In the beginning of April, Russia officially launched the ‘Eurasia dialogue’ that will serve as the groundwork for discussions on creating a Eurasian Union. Furthermore, in October 2011 then Prime Minister Vladimir Putin voiced a new integration project that invoked a controversial reaction form the West. Many talked …

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Can the U.S. and Russia Get Along?

Can the U.S. and Russia Get Along?

With the Russian presidential election behind us, and rather predictable western not-so- optimistic attitudes towards their results, one would expect a further cooling of U.S. -Russia relations. The Obama administration belated congratulation to the President-elect Putin and deepening of anti-Russian rhetoric in American political circles are just a few signs …

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On Elections, Protests and Anti-American Sentiment in Russia

On Elections, Protests and Anti-American Sentiment in Russia

The closer we get to the presidential election, the more anti-American discourse appears in Russian media. The anti-American rhetoric is not a novelty in a country that lived through decades of the Cold War parity with the United States; it takes a long time for old phobias and …

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Blame Them, Not Us: Adoption as a Political Tool

Blame Them, Not Us: Adoption as a Political Tool

On January 18, Russia’s Ombudsman for children, Pavel Astakhov, and Foreign Minister, Sergey Lavrov, stated that they would seek an official moratorium on adoption of Russian children by American families. Cooperation on adoption between the two countries has seen its ups and downs following the pattern of U.S. -Russia relations, …

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2012: In Search of Russian Carrots and Sticks

2012: In Search of Russian Carrots and Sticks

The December protests in Russia against parliamentary election results have marked a momentous change to the current Russian political situation. The protests have revealed the looming necessity for authorities to respond in a timely manner, and to acknowledge the new scenario. Widespread public discontent with existing policies is shaping a new, uncomfortable reality for …

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Year in Review: Russia 2011

Year in Review: Russia 2011

United States
For Russia’s Foreign Policy, 2011 started with a breakthrough signing of the START Treaty that fostered new hopes and brighter prospects for U.S. -Russia relations. Alas, the enthusiasm from the successful agreement was soon soured by less effective negotiations on the U.S. deployment of a ballistic missile shield in …

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United Against ‘United Russia’

United Against ‘United Russia’

Last Saturday Russia witnessed one of the biggest anti-government rallies of the past two decades. Just a few months ago the possibility of a protest this large seemed very unlikely. Putin’s confidence ratings remained high holding steadfast belief in the efficiency of a strong ruling hand over the country, although the …

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Nagging Cracks in U.S.-Russia Relations

Nagging Cracks in U.S.-Russia Relations

Events of this past November revealed more cracks in U.S. -Russia relations that seemed propitious just several months ago. To start with, on November 22, the U.S. announced the decision to cease its obligations under The Conventional Armed Forces in Europe Treaty (CFE), referring to information sharing and …

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Many Sides of Russian March

Many Sides of Russian March

Another Russian March Rally commemorated the recent National Unity Day in Russia. The celebration of accord and reconciliation succeeded former Soviet holiday dedicated to the Great Russian Revolution. The new holiday introduces a tradition of Russian nationalist rally, so called, Russian March, exciting for some, …

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Blacklists Exchange: A Weaker Side of ‘Reset’?

Blacklists Exchange: A Weaker Side of ‘Reset’?

  U.S. – Russia political interactions often resemble a swinging pendulum that goes from hardly negotiated consensus to deepening disagreement and swooping across to ‘tit for tat‘ tactics. The Recent Russian response to U.S. ‘Magnitsky list’ is a good example of that.
The story began …

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Russian Elections: Putin for President?

Russian Elections: Putin for President?


As the presidential elections approach in Russia with the vote due in March 2012, media and opinion polls point out at the growing apathy amongst Russian population. Gloomy and grim attitudes stem from widespread perceptions that the positions of president and prime minister are predetermined with …

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About the Author

Ania Viver
Ania Viver

Ania Viver is an editorial/research assistant at WorldAffairsJournal.org. She recently graduated with a masters degree from the John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall, where she focused on Foreign Policy and the South Caucasus region. Prior to moving to the US from her native Russia, Ania worked for six years as a trilingual assistant to the regional coordinator on international programs.

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