Foreign Policy Blogs

Archive by Author

Will the Iraqi Endgame be repeated in Afghanistan?

Will the Iraqi Endgame be repeated in Afghanistan?

Even as President Obama trumpets his plans to withdraw U.S. combat troops from Afghanistan in two years’ time, he also insists (though in a sotto voce way) that he wants to maintain a limited but long-term military presence focused on counter-terrorism missions and training Afghan security …

read more

Is the India-Pakistan Thaw Losing Momentum?

Is the India-Pakistan Thaw Losing Momentum?

A maladroit visit to New Delhi is a harbinger of things to come
The headline visit to India this past weekend by Pakistan’s de-facto interior minister, Rehman Malik, was supposed to celebrate the latest milestone in the détente process that has picked up speed between the two countries …

read more

Can Xi Jinping Revive the “China Rising” Narrative?

Can Xi Jinping Revive the “China Rising” Narrative?

Whether he is the new Deng Xiaoping will say much about the contours of the evolving global order
My post earlier this week argued that China’s long-term prospects are more uncertain than the conventional wisdom holds.  The country’s new leader, Xi Jinping, is raising hopes that he is the man …

read more

Syria is a Test of U.S. Credibility on Iran

Syria is a Test of U.S. Credibility on Iran

Shifting red lines in Syria undermines the tough rhetoric toward Tehran
Many observers have connected the civil war raging in Syria to the broader U.S. standoff with Iran.  Critics of the Obama administration’s extremely cautious approach on Syria argue that pushing more forcefully for the demise of …

read more

America vs. China: A Counter-Narrative Arises

America vs. China: A Counter-Narrative Arises

Given all the fanciful prognostications about how China is poised to eat America’s lunch, it might sound odd that the country’s new leader, Xi Jinping, is sloganeering about the need for national “rejuvenation” and “revival.”  He is, of course, attempting to harness patriotic sentiments in order to boost the Communist …

read more

Obama is still bluffing on Iran

Obama is still bluffing on Iran

An unexpected shadow was cast over President Obama’s swing through Southeast Asia last week by the fighting in Gaza between Israel and Hamas.  The diversion is interpreted by some as a sign of how the combustibility of the Middle East will undercut Washington’s much-ballyhooed “pivot” toward …

read more

America’s Strategic Rebound: An Update

America’s Strategic Rebound: An Update

A few quick updates are in order for a regular theme in this blog: Amid a torrent of extravagant prophesying about how China is poised to conquer the world, technological innovations and private entrepreneurs are actually rejuvenating America’s strategic prospects.
As previous posts (here and

read more

Memo to the Next President: The Boldness of Enterprise and U.S. Strategic Revival

Memo to the Next President: The Boldness of Enterprise and U.S. Strategic Revival

Honoring the vitality of America’s private sector
The docket of whoever wins today’s presidential election will quickly fill up with unsolicited advice, so I’ll get mine in preemptively: When the White House decides on the next set of recipients for the Presidential Medal of Freedom – the nation’s highest civilian award …

read more

Obama and Afghanistan: An Update

Obama and Afghanistan: An Update

There are several updates to the key points I outlined in last week’s post about President Obama’s handling of the Afghan war.
The first concerns the success of the surge of 30,000 extra troops that Mr. Obama announced in December 2009, most of which …

read more

How Well Has Mr. Obama Waged His “War of Necessity”?

How Well Has Mr. Obama Waged His “War of Necessity”?

 

There are major dents in the president’s foreign policy claims
A spate of new books offers critical appraisals of President Obama’s stewardship of national affairs.  Bob Woodward’s latest volume, “The Price of Politics,” draws an unflattering portrait of his management of fiscal policy, echoing themes in Ron Suskind’s …

read more

India-Pakistan Rapprochement: How Long Will It Last?

India-Pakistan Rapprochement: How Long Will It Last?

The cross-border bonhomie is likely to reach its limit as 2013 unfolds
Last week’s signing of a landmark visa agreement making cross-border travel easier between India and Pakistan, especially for business people, is the latest sign of how economic engagement is driving the peace dialogue the two countries launched …

read more

Beware the Benchmarks to India

Beware the Benchmarks to India

The country really isn’t a global competitor to the United States
The Competition that Really Matters,” a new report jointly released by the Center for American Progress (a think tank with close ties to the Obama administration) and the Center for the Next Generation, contends that …

read more

U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Thinking about the Long Term

U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Thinking about the Long Term

It’s Time for a New Smart Power Approach
To chart the deterioration of ties between Washington and Islamabad over the last two years, as well as the conundrums gnawing at Obama administration officials, consider the following: Despite Pakistan’s official designation as a “major non-NATO ally,” its egregious …

read more

Pakistan: The White Stripe Withers

Pakistan: The White Stripe Withers


What would Jinnah think about what the country has become?
South Asia last week harkened back to the events of August 1947.  The 65th anniversary of Indian and Pakistani independence brought forth the expected homage to the ideals that accompanied the dissolution of the British Raj.  Yet even amid …

read more

The Next Showdown in U.S.-Pakistan Relations

The Next Showdown in U.S.-Pakistan Relations


Fresh tests await the epically dysfunctional partnership
Last month’s agreement on NATO supply routes provided some hope that the two-year long free fall in U.S.-Pakistani relations was at an end.  But new serious tests await the epically dysfunctional partnership.
One sign of the tensions that remain is Islamabad’s mounting accusations …

read more

About the Author

David J. Karl
David J. Karl

David J. Karl is president of the Asia Strategy Initiative, an analysis and advisory firm that has a particular focus on South Asia. He serves on the board of counselors of Young Professionals in Foreign Policy and previously on the Executive Committee of the Southern California chapter of TiE (formerly The Indus Entrepreneurs), the world's largest not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting entrepreneurship.

David previously served as director of studies at the Pacific Council on International Policy, in charge of the Council’s think tank focused on foreign policy issues of special resonance to the U.S West Coast, and was project director of the Bi-national Task Force on Enhancing India-U.S. Cooperation in the Global Innovation Economy that was jointly organized by the Pacific Council and the Federation of Indian Chambers & Industry. He received his doctorate in international relations at the University of Southern California, writing his dissertation on the India-Pakistan strategic rivalry, and took his masters degree in international relations from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

GreadDecisions in foreign policy discussion group ad v2