Foreign Policy Blogs

Archive by Author

Quebec Oil-Train Accident Assures Building of XL Pipeline

Quebec Oil-Train Accident Assures Building of XL Pipeline

Lac Megantic, Quebec, is a little town near the border with Maine, and it’s the kind of place where news doesn’t get made. Unfortunately for the people there, the town made headlines on July 6 when a number of oil tanker cars somehow rolled a few miles from the train’s …

read more

Norwegian Company Starts Thorium Reactor Test

Norwegian Company Starts Thorium Reactor Test

Ever since the nuclear power industry was born, its proponents have tried to find safer ways of using nuclear fission to generate electricity. And there is no doubt that the reactors built today are safer than those erected in the 1950s. However, the main problem with nuclear power as it …

read more

EPA Slams State over XL Pipeline

EPA Slams State over XL Pipeline

In addition to being Earth Day, yesterday was the end of the State Department’s 45-day comment period on the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline project. Among the 800,000 comments is a letter to State from the Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA is not particularly happy with the …

read more

U.K. Energy Shortage: A Cautionary Tale

U.K. Energy Shortage: A Cautionary Tale

Britain is suffering its worst winter in 50 years. Everyone is grumbling about their fuel bills and wondering what has happened to spring. Soccer and rugby matches and horse-racing fixtures have been canceled. The government has warned that if the weather persists like this for another couple of weeks, rationing …

read more

State Department Says XL Pipeline Won’t Affect Oil Sands Development

State Department Says XL Pipeline Won’t Affect Oil Sands Development

The Department of State has released a 2000-page draft Supplementary Environmental Impact Statement regarding the XL Keystone Pipeline. In the words of the executive summary, the report “concludes that approval or denial of the proposed Project is unlikely to have a substantial impact on the rate of development in the …

read more

American Energy Independence Might Not Change Things Much

American Energy Independence Might Not Change Things Much

Thanks to fracking and the oil rush in North Dakota, many analysts predict energy independence for North America, and even for the U.S. itself. The most recent high-profile prediction came from Citigroup’ s global commodities research team, headed by Edward Morse. They issued an 85-page report, which sadly is not …

read more

Iran Admits Sanctions Hurt Revenue

Iran Admits Sanctions Hurt Revenue

Iran’s revenue from oil exports is off by 40% thanks to the sanctions imposed by the U.S. and EU over the Iranian nuclear program.  Oil Minister Rostam Qasemi told the budget commission of the Iranian parliament, “There has been a 40 percent decrease in oil sales and a 45 percent …

read more

General Wesley Clark on Energy and National Security 

General Wesley Clark on Energy and National Security 

After a panel discussion at New York University shortly before November’s election, General Wesley Clark (ret.) was kind enough to answer some questions regarding the national security dimension of America’s energy situation. This piece originally appeared in the Kensington Review.
Q: What security threats bother …

read more

Britain Announces Energy Efficiency Strategy

Britain Announces Energy Efficiency Strategy

In the field of energy, conservation is about the least sexy topic out there. However, it is also the one area that can affect the picture immediately, and for that reason, we ought to be paying greater attention to it. For its part, the British government has just released its …

read more

Baghdad’s Oil Payment Deal with Kurds Helps Boost Exports

Baghdad’s Oil Payment Deal with Kurds Helps Boost Exports

Iraq’s oil minister Abdul Kareem Luaiby anticipates his country’s exports for September to exceed 2.6 million barrels a day, a figure not reached in the last 20 or so years. Part of this increase stems from a deal cut between the central government and the Kurdish autonomous region. The Kurds …

read more

Scottish Government Unveils Plans for World’s Largest Wind Farm

Scottish Government Unveils Plans for World’s Largest Wind Farm

As August ended, the Scottish government unveiled plans for the world’s largest wind farm in the Moray Firth, in the country’s far northeast. The government plans to spend £4.5 billion to erect 339 wind turbines off shore which would generate 1,500 MW, about the same as a conventional power plant. …

read more

Warm Sea Water Forces Reactor Shut Down

Warm Sea Water Forces Reactor Shut Down

 
The consensus about Fukushima’s nuclear disaster holds that human error caused the partial meltdown. Failure to anticipate what went wrong is at the heart of the matter. Over the weekend, a reactor at the the Millstone nuclear power plant in Waterford, Conn., closed down because its designers back in the …

read more

Indian Blackout Lesson: Invest in Infrastructure

Indian Blackout Lesson: Invest in Infrastructure

A couple of days ago, over 600 million people (that’s not a typo, six hundred million – 600,000,000) lost electrical power when three electricity grids in India collapsed. The cause was simple, demand outstripped supply, and the mechanisms in place to manage the imbalance were just not up to the …

read more

Megatons to Megawatts is 90% Complete

Megatons to Megawatts is 90% Complete

One of the greatest problems in the post-Cold War era has been what to do with the leftover highly enriched uranium [HEU], also known as weapons-grade uranium. When the US and USSR were engaged in the nuclear arms race, tons of the stuff was produced in the hopes it would …

read more

Alberta’s New Energy Minister on the Keystone XL Pipeline

Alberta’s New Energy Minister on the Keystone XL Pipeline

The following was posted in The Kensington Review, which interviewed by email Ken Hughes, the newly appointed Energy Minister in the Canadian Province of Alberta. We are grateful to the minister for his time, and to the staff in the provincial …

read more

About the Author

Jeff Myhre
Jeff Myhre

Jeff Myhre is a graduate of the University of Colorado where he double majored in history and international affairs. He earned his PhD at the London School of Economics in international relations, and his dissertation was published by Westview Press under the title The Antarctic Treaty System: Politics, Law and Diplomacy. He is the founder of The Kensington Review, an online journal of commentary launched in 2002 which discusses politics, economics and social developments. He has written on European politics, international finance, and energy and resource issues in numerous publications and for such private entities as Lloyd's of London Press and Moody's Investors Service. He is a member of both the Foreign Policy Association and the World Policy Institute.

GreadDecisions in foreign policy discussion group ad v2