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Politicizing Medicine in Bahrain

Politicizing Medicine in Bahrain

One of the uprisings in the Middle East that has failed to garner a lot of attention is the situation in Bahrain. Even though Bahrainis took to the Lulu Roundabout much the same way Egyptians did in Tahrir Square just days after Mubarak’s ouster and before major protests broke out …

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Flotilla Wars 3.0

Flotilla Wars 3.0

In May 2010, Israel raided a flotilla of aid ships determined to breach the maritime blockade of Gaza which activists claim violates international law by imposing collective punishment on the civilian population of …

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The World Loses a Champion of Development in Wangari Maathai

The World Loses a Champion of Development in Wangari Maathai


Wangari Maathai, Nobel laureate and founder of the Green Belt Movement in Kenya, passed away late Sunday night while undergoing cancer treatment in Nairobi. But she left the world having fully lived her 71 years, to the benefit of the rest …

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On Troy Davis, the death penalty, and reasonable doubt

On Troy Davis, the death penalty, and reasonable doubt

Guest post by Emily Hauser
Reasonable people can certainly hold differing opinions on the question of the death penalty. I am, personally, opposed to state executions under any circumstances, but I do understand those who feel that monstrous acts deserve the harshest possible consequences – I also understand the desire to …

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Ramadan Starts with Violence in Syria

Ramadan Starts with Violence in Syria


For followers of Islam, Ramadan is the holy month that marks the revelation of the first verses of the Koran to the Prophet Mohammad and is a time of fasting, contemplation, and charity. As the Arab Spring continues to progress through …

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Airing tonight: “Mugabe and the White African”

Airing tonight: “Mugabe and the White African”

Airing tonight as part of the POV series on PBS is the stirring documentary film “Mugabe and the White African.” The film follows the story of Michael Campbell, one of the few White farmers to stay in Zimbabwe following …

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World Struggles to Respond to Famine in Somalia

World Struggles to Respond to Famine in Somalia


Last week the UN declared a famine in two regions of Southern Somalia and warned that it could spread to other parts of the Horn of Africa. That is a big deal. As

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In Search of Justice in Cambodia

In Search of Justice in Cambodia


Public gallery at the ECCC at the start of Case 002.
Photo courtesy of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia
On Monday, more than 32 years after the Khmer Rouge fell from power in Cambodia, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia …

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Guest Post: Egypt After the Revolution

By Atef Said
I got on a plane to Cairo on February 4, ten days after Egyptians took to the streets in a popular revolution that eventually led to the ouster of notorious dictator Hosni Mubarak. I had mixed emotions when leaving for Egypt: anxiety about the family I was leaving …

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Rwanda, Press Freedom & Twitter

Reactions to the so-called twitterspat between Rwandan President Paul Kagame, Rwandan Foreign Minister Louise Mushikiwabo and British journalist Ian Birrell that I

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Kagame goes on Twitter

On Saturday, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda engaged in an off the cuff debate with British journalist Ian Birrell on Twitter regarding the right of non-Rwandans to judge Rwanda and the ongoing argument over the human rights situation in the country. Yes, you read that correctly: a sitting head of …

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Europe's growing double standards

Penelope Chester wrote a post today that I highly recommend on the double standards increasingly demonstrated by European countries, especially France. One clear example is when it comes to issues of immigration. On the recent call by France and Italy to revise …

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The cost of telling the story

The cost of telling the story

Today has been a difficult day.
In the world of human rights, we often talk of the need to bear witness. This is why organizations like the UN, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and others send investigators and analysts to distant lands to record and document possible abuses that may be …

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Watching the endgame in Cote d'Ivoire

It was supposed to be the final stage of a nearly decade long peace process. It was supposed to finally put to rest the civil war that tore the country apart in the 1990s. It was supposed to be the start to a new chapter in Cote d’Ivoire’s history, one …

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The President and Human Rights

The President and Human Rights

 

Once a year, as mandated by the Constitution, the President of the United States gives an address to Congress updating them on the state of the union. Over time, much ceremony and tradition has been attached to the State of the Union …

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About the Author

Kimberly J. Curtis
Kimberly J. Curtis

Kimberly Curtis has a Master's degree in International Affairs and a Juris Doctor from American University in Washington, DC. She is a co-founder of The Women's Empowerment Institute of Cameroon and has worked for human rights organizations in Rwanda and the United States. You can follow her on Twitter at @curtiskj

Areas of Focus: Transitional justice; Women's rights; Africa

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