Foreign Policy Blogs

Sub-Saharan Africa

Press Freedom Watchdog Highlights Troubling Developments in Kenya

Press Freedom Watchdog Highlights Troubling Developments in Kenya

Kenya has garnered praise for becoming one of Sub-Saharan Africa’s fastest growing economies. Now, its government is coming under fire for some recent troubling developments affecting its fourth estate.

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International Security: We’re Doing it Wrong

International Security: We’re Doing it Wrong

Is a re-think of the Western-led international security enterprise needed to respond to a set of interrelated trends that have little to do with conflict between great states and far more to do with dysfunction within fragile states?

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Does the Egyptian Military Regime Work for U.S. and Allies?

Does the Egyptian Military Regime Work for U.S. and Allies?

Since the Egyptian military ousted former President Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood government in a coup in July 2013, a stricter and an increasingly oppressive rule governs Africa's third most populous country, but one that may not be that unwelcome with the U.S. or its allies.

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Nigeria’s Watershed Elections

Nigeria’s Watershed Elections

Nigeria, a country of 170 million, spread out in several hundred ethnic groups and split right down the middle between a Christian south and a Muslim north, will head to the polls on Feb. 14 to elect its new president in what promises to be the country’s defining democratic moment.

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U.S. policy forces Nigeria to turn east

U.S. policy forces Nigeria to turn east

If the reports of the dead are true, this would be Boko Haram's deadliest attack to date. War between the Islamic extremist group and Nigeria began in 2009, and has claimed an estimated 13,000 lives in six years.

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The Tinderbox of South Sudan

The Tinderbox of South Sudan

South Sudan, the world’s youngest state, faces a serious prospect of ethnic civil war. When it gained independence from Sudan in July 2011, after decades of war between north and south, the world’s attention was focused on the disputed territory of Abyei. A declining oil-producing region Inhabited by southern farmers ...

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U.S. Stability Operations Shouldn’t Short-change Africa

U.S. Stability Operations Shouldn’t Short-change Africa

Al-Qaeda’s incursion into Iraq’s Fallujah area last weekend illustrates the conflict as primarily a stability operations battle – a test over who can legitimately and ably govern – and not a weakness of the U.S. withdrawal or shortfall of Iraqi forces. Predictably dozens of policy pages began trumpeting that the ...

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2014 African Election Preview

2014 African Election Preview

Millions of citizens of African countries will go to the polls in Presidential, parliamentary/legislative, state/provincial, and local elections in 2014. We will surely cover many of those here at the FPA. Here is an early preview of which elections are happening where (as of January 8) with brief commentary on ...

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Will It Work This Time?

Will It Work This Time?

This is something rare. Knowledge of a rapidly deteriorating situation in Africa and a somewhat timely, actual action by those in the world with the power to intervene. The situation is in the Central African Republic. And that intervening is the first step to stabilizing the slaughter and – hopefully – ...

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Remembering Mandela and his Foreign Policy

Remembering Mandela and his Foreign Policy

When I heard the news that Nelson Mandela, our beloved Madiba, was gone, I had flashbacks to the first time I laid eyes on my South African wife. I didn’t know much about South Africa at the time, and for some reason or another I kept calling her “Mandela” over ...

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Madiba: Hamba Kahle

Madiba: Hamba Kahle

It happened when I was watching ESPN. I discovered that Madiba had passed. It was like a punch to the gut, even though I knew it was coming. He had been ill since I was in South Africa in June, July, and August, and yet it came from nowhere. And so now ...

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African youth perceptions of the U.S.

African youth perceptions of the U.S.

  Being an American professor living in Africa and teaching international relations, I have been involved in numerous debates about my country and its foreign policy. Obviously you get your mix, some pro-U.S. and some not. To try and make better sense of the situation, I decided to embark on a little ...

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Delivery and South African Politics

Delivery and South African Politics

Recent protests in Cape Town (and an article about those protests in the Mail and Guardian) provide a useful reminder that much of the discontent among South Africans, even those who otherwise would proclaim their fealty to the African National Congress (ANC), comes down to the delivery of services. ...

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Even if Kony turns himself in, he still emerges as the victor

Even if Kony turns himself in, he still emerges as the victor

In 1986, after years of terror under the reign of Idi Amin and a resistance that yielded two successful military coups, Yoweri Museveni emerged as the unchallenged leader of Uganda, as his National Resistance Army seized Kampala and installed Museveni as president. That same year, another rebel group ...

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AFRICOM and US-African Relations

AFRICOM and US-African Relations

What is the United States interest in Africa? What do African leaders and the people they are supposed to serve want from American engagement in their continent and in their countries? If we have a Venn diagram where the answers to these two questions exist as circles, where is the ...

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