Foreign Policy Blogs

Archive by Author

Is Ireland going to be in the Hudson?

Is Ireland going to be in the Hudson?

Morgan Kelly, the reluctant hero of Michael Lewis’ tale of Gaelic misadventure and Irish banking woes in March’s Vanity Fair, had the leading op-ed in Ireland Sunday warning that by agreeing to a bailout, the Irish economy has actually doomed its economy. To recap, in 2009 the Irish government decided to nationalize four major banks […]

read more

The Dragon's Demographic Challenge: How Fast Can China Grow?

The Dragon's Demographic Challenge: How Fast Can China Grow?

I recently came across an interesting paper at Brookings by Wang Feng,  The Future of a Demographic Overachiever: Long-Term Implications of the Demographic Transition in China.  The title of the paper is self-explanatory as to the subject.  Through his research,  Wang found a consistent continual demographic decline in China.  This is not necessarily news, but […]

read more

The Hamas-al Qaeda Non-Alliance

Beware of arguments like those offered in Jonathan Schanzer’s Weekly Standard article, “The Hamas-al Qaeda Alliance.”  The article was a response to the statement earlier this week from senior Hamas leader, Ismail Haniyeh, who condemned the bin Laden killing.  Schanzer essentially attempts to conflate al Qaeda and Hamas, writing that “over the course of two […]

read more

Syria Reconsidered

Last week I wrote that inaction in Washington and at the UN does not live up to the brave and hopeful Syrians who have taken to the streets in protest of the Assad government. Many there probably looked at NATO’s intervention in Libya and expected something similar to happen if protests in Syria persisted. They […]

read more

Law, Justice, Bin Laden

The debate about whether the U.S. killing of Osama bin Laden was legal is on.  It was legal, says John Bellinger, justified under the same rationale as U.S. drone attacks in Pakistan.  Though there’s a pretty fierce debate about the legality of the drones program, thrust to a new level of complexity after Pakistan withdrew […]

read more

New "wave" of migrant labor more likely to be ripple

Germany and Austria opened their labor markets for the EU class of 2004 over the weekend, the last EU nations to do so. However, based on press reports from Germany and Poland, there appear to be divergent views regarding how much labor will actually transfer. The Frankfurter Allegmeine Zeitung believes that any Pole seeking work […]

read more

AFGHANISTAN: ALREADY AT UNEASE FOR POST-WAR

AFGHANISTAN: ALREADY AT UNEASE FOR POST-WAR Afghanistan may be one place, where its people have legitimate worries after the elimination of one of the strongest points of the U.S. war on terror. Now that the “terrorist” is gone, the war might be shortened, making the Afghan lands abandoned once again. No surprise that there were […]

read more

Pakistan And The Bin Laden Killing

One of the most important dimensions of this development is the extent to which Pakistan was involved, both in harboring bin Laden and in executing the operation that killed him.  The Pakistan section of Obama’s Sunday night speech jumped out at me: But it’s important to note that our counterterrorism cooperation with Pakistan helped lead […]

read more

If I've Said It Once…

From ABC News: Syrian army units have clashed with each other over following President Bashar Assad’s orders to crack down on protesters in Daraa, a besieged city at the heart of the uprising, witnesses and human rights groups said Thursday… “There are some battalions that refused to open fire on the people,” Monajed told The […]

read more

Trading With the Enemy: The Bear and the Dragon Update

In an update to the previous post, Russia is already accusing China of trying to fix market prices for the new Skovorodino-Daqing.  That’s very shocking, I know. Business Insider posted an article stating that the Russian government owned  pipeline company Transneft is not only accusing the Chinese National Petroleum Company (CNPC) of violating the terms […]

read more

The Case for Syria

The Case for Syria

It’s a beautiful April day here in Brooklyn. New York Spring might be only just taking root but in the Middle East, the Arab Spring is in full bloom. I was there two months ago but thinking about it now makes it seem like decades ago. This morning I turned on Al Jazeera and watched […]

read more

Egypt's New National Party

I want to highlight a story from a week and a half ago that I don’t think has received the attention it deserves: the decision of Egypt’s Supreme Administrative Court to dissolve the National Democratic Party (NDP).  As Christian Science Monitor reported: …[M]any in Egypt had feared that the party of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak […]

read more

Cut The Head Of The Snake Off?

There may seem like there’s a big debate about NATO’s policy in Libya, especially after last weekend’s State of the Union episode, in which Lindsey Graham advocated a “cut the head of the snake off” policy.  John McCain and Joe Lieberman also appeared on the program to make similar statements.  But if we actually look […]

read more

Trading With the Enemy: The Bear and the Dragon

Trading With the Enemy: The Bear and the Dragon

In the last installment of the two part “Trading with the Enemy” Series, this blog looked a serious issues of contention affecting Sino-American trade-relations, cyber-espionage and hacking.  Now we will examine a  little discussed area of discomfort,  trade between China and it’s very large northern neighbor, Russia.  Over the last two decades, the Sino-Russo “Cold […]

read more

Not Peace, But A Sword

As I’ve written of Passover and Chanukah, Easter too is, ultimately, a story about the oppressed becoming the oppressors.  One can interpret the Gospels to mean that Jesus advocated violence.  After all, he did say “I did not come to bring peace, but a sword” (Matthew 10:34), though many disagree on the meaning of the […]

read more

About the Author

FPB Contributor

americasdiplomats_socialmediaasset

Blog Authors

FPA Administrator