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Indian Editor in Chennai Tortured

Following reports that the editor of Indian magazine Naveena Netrikkan has been arrested and tortured, press freedom organizations are calling for his release. Mr. A.S. Mani was reportedly arrested, imprisoned and tortured after reporting on police corruption in the Indian state of Chennai, in Tamil Nadu. Reporters Without Borders issued the transcript of an interview […]

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After Bus Tragedy, Phillipine President Wants Media Restrictions

Following a hostage crisis in the Philippines, the country’s president, Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III, wants the media to cooperate with the government on guidelines in future crises. According to reports, Aquino wants to put his “agenda” for media coverage during crises on the table. He is contending that the press played a role in the […]

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Long Live South Africa's Free Press

If you blinked in the past month, you probably missed the battle for freedom of the press that is raging in South Africa. Earlier this month, the editors of South Africa’s major publications issued a statement of protest dubbed the Auckland Park Declaration. The Declaration was issued in response to clauses in the Protection of […]

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Front Page Controversy Over Photos in Venezuela

A major Venezuelan newspaper is butting heads with the government over the right to publish graphic photos on their front page. El Nacional, one of the country’s oldest newspapers, has been ordered to stop publishing certain types of photos. According to the Associated Press: A court ordered one of Venezuela’s leading newspapers on Tuesday to […]

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Pakistan's Bizarre Media Blackout

In a strange twist on the tense situation in Pakistan following flooding that caused 1,600 deaths, the media is being silenced. Pakistan’s two major media outlets–ARY TV and Geo TV–have been silenced for the past 3 days in Karachi and Sindh province. The row started after the stations reported on a story about President Asif […]

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The Odd Case of Newsweek

The sale of Newsweek has people in the media industry scratching their heads. Partly because it went to California tycoon Sidney Harman (who has now media experience), and partly because of the numbers behind the deal. According to the Columbia Journalism Review’s (CJR) analysis of Newsweek’s numbers (courtesy of The Daily Beast), the company was […]

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Vietnam's Dirty Little War on Writers

Vietnam's Dirty Little War on Writers

The media is often used by those with competing messages to disseminate information or dis-information. Sometimes, though, the message is a lie. Vietnam is an unfortunate example of manipulating the media and choking free speech for their own destructive ends. Just yesterday, several Vietnamese writers were given honors for their work under severe pressure from […]

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Lebanese Reporter Dead After Clashes on Border

Lebanese Reporter Dead After Clashes on Border

A Lebanese reporter was killed during fighting on the Israel-Lebanon border on Tuesday. The reporter, Assaf Abu Rahal, worked for the Lebanese daily Al-Akhbar. According to media reports and press freedom organizations, he was killed near the southern town of Al-Adaysseh. He was killed when a shell landed next to him. Abu Rahal was 55 […]

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WikiLeaks's Material Out of Context and Confusing

Much has been made over WikiLeaks’s recent document leak on Afghanistan. Some of the most interesting commentary can be found from journalists. The Columbia Journalism Review says in an article called “The Story Behind the Publication of WikiLeaks’s Afghanistan Log” that the most interesting part of the story is what happened behind the scenes before […]

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Foreign Anti-Libel Bill Passes Senate

Bipartisan legislation that would protect journalists from libel suits filed abroad, authored by Senators Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), passed the U.S. Senate last week. S. 3518 the Securing the Protection of our Enduring and Established Constitutional Heritage Act or SPEECH Act, would prohibit a domestic court from recognizing or enforcing a foreign […]

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What the Media Doesn't Say About Falun Gong

11 Years ago, on July 20, 1999, a persecution against a meditation practice called Falun Gong (or Falun Dafa) officially started in Mainland China. The persecution of Falun Gong was the brainchild of former Chinese president Jiang Zemin, who saw Falun Gong’s enormous popularity among 100 million Chinese and simply wanted to crush it. I […]

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Talk Isn't Cheap in Attleboro, MA

Apparently there were some unusually rude people posting comments to the Sun Chronicle’s website in Attleboro, MA. The online version of the paper no longer allows just anyone to register a comment. You practically have to give them a map to your where you live. Usually I only comment on this blog about affairs related […]

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Journalists in Rwanda Under Attack

The latest in a string of attacks on the media in Rwanda has targeted Agnes Uwimana, editor of Umurabyo, a private newspaper in Rwanda. She was charged with defaming the president and espousing genocide. Uwimana’s arrest and other attacks on the media have captured the attention of press freedom organizations for weeks. The Rwandan government […]

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CNN Editor Fired for a Tweet

CNN Editor Fired for a Tweet

An editor at CNN who sent out a Tweet expressing regret over the death of Hezbollah’s spiritual adviser paid for the Tweet with her job. Fadlallah died Sunday in a hospital in Beirut, Lebanon. When Mideast Editor Octavia Nasr tweeted about the death of Ayatollah Muhammad Hussein Fadlallah, Hezbollah’s spiritual advisor she said, “Sad to […]

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30 Years in Photos: How Afghanistan has Changed

30 Years in Photos: How Afghanistan has Changed

Photographer Steve McCurry, perhaps best known for his National Geographic cover photo of an Afghan woman with haunting eyes, talked with Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty recently about how Afghanistan has changed in the past 30 years. A woman in Paris looks at a poster of the famous photograph of Sharbat Gula. July 06, 2010 Steve […]

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About the Author

Genevieve Belmaker
Genevieve Belmaker

Genevieve Belmaker is a freelance journalist and contributing editor with The Epoch Times (www.theepochtimes.com). She also contributes to Quill, the magazine of the Society of Professional Journalists and Poynter.org. Her blog on journalism is http://artofreportage.com.

Genevieve has traveled throughout the U.S., Asia, Central America, Israel and the West Bank for reporting assignments, including major investigative reports on the recovery of New Orleans, the encroaching presence of China in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, the dangerous import of melamine-contaminated milk into the U.S. and settlement outposts in the West Bank. She regularly reports on issues related to journalism, and the work of journalists.

She holds a BA from the University of Southern California in International Relations, and has been a member of several prominent national and international professional media organizations, including the Society of Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporters and Editors, the International Women’s Media Foundation, the New York Press Club, and the Newswomen’s Club of New York. She lives in Jerusalem, Israel with her husband and son.

Areas of Focus:
New Media; Journalism; Culture and Society

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