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Pakistan or “the country in question”?

Pakistan or “the country in question”?

On Monday, February 10, the Associated Press broke a story that the Obama administration is mulling over potentially conducting a drone strike on a U.S. citizen in an unidentified country who is allegedly plotting terrorist attacks. The AP notes that it withheld the name of the country “because officials said publishing it could interrupt ongoing […]

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How to track U.S. drone strikes from a mobile device

How to track U.S. drone strikes from a mobile device

Persistence proved to be a winning strategy for one app developer this weekend. Metadata+, data artist Josh Begley’s iOS app that presents “real-time updates on national security,” was approved and released by Apple. The app, formerly known as Drones+, had been rejected by Apple several times prior to its release. In one rejection letter, Apple noted […]

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Four things the SOTU missed: Defense edition

Four things the SOTU missed: Defense edition

President Barack Obama’s 2014 State of the Union address on Tuesday, January 28, addressed a number of foreign policy issues, from Iran, the Israel-Palestine conflict and the winding down of a 13-year war in Afghanistan. There were, however, some significant gaps. Here are three of them: 1.) Military sexual assault Despite a heavy focus on […]

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GCHQ’s Squeaking Dolphins

GCHQ’s Squeaking Dolphins

In addition to leaks about the use of “leaky” mobile apps — including the highly-popular Angry Birds — yesterday’s revelations included a document dump explaining a program called “Squeaky Dolphin.” A slideshow entitled “Psychology A New Kind of SIGDEV” from Britain’s Government Security Headquarters (GCHQ) and obtained by NBC News via Edward Snowden the equivalent of […]

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NSA: From Angry Birds to the GOP

NSA: From Angry Birds to the GOP

On the heels of Obama’s signal intelligence speech and just a day before the president’s State of the Union address, yet another Snowden document dump has come to the fore, this time detailing data collection activities from leaky mobile apps, such as Angry Birds. Mobile networks have proven to be a rich resource for the […]

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FISC jurists: White House reforms too “cumbersome”

FISC jurists: White House reforms too “cumbersome”

Three days before Obama’s highly anticipated speech on Friday, January 17, and amidst further revelations of the National Security Agency’s surveillance powers, former Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court officials are raising a ruckus. Judge John D. Bates—former presiding judge of the FISC and current director of the Administrative Office of the United States Court—has raised a number […]

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On Christmas and “Holy Wisdom”: Orthodoxy in Turkey

On Christmas and “Holy Wisdom”: Orthodoxy in Turkey

January 7 marks Christmas Day for Julian Calendar-abiding Orthodox Christians (Eastern and Armenian) and Turkey’s EU Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu has taken the opportunity to wish Turkey’s dwindling Christian population a merry Christmas. Hurriyet Daily News reports: Anatolia has always been a country of tolerance and home to different beliefs and cultures throughout history, Çavuşoğlu said in a […]

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Year in Review: 2013 in Drones

Year in Review: 2013 in Drones

From botched attacks to UAV landings to Jeff Bezos’ fleet, drones have made headlines in 2013. Here are some of the most important 2013 events in the UAV world. X-47B carrier landing The X-47B, Northrop Grumman’s unmanned aerial combat vehicle (UCAV) designed for carrier-based operations, made headlines earlier this year as it became the first unmanned […]

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Out with the Old, in with the Old

Out with the Old, in with the Old

On Dec. 11, 2013, a U.S. drone strike mistakenly struck a wedding convoy in an isolated region of Yemen, taking out five suspected Al Qaeda militants along with a dozen civilians in the process. The Obama administration’s “new” drone policy—announced by the president on May 23, 2013, in a speech at National Defense University—promised more […]

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DOJ on Drones: “Let’s Talk”

DOJ on Drones: “Let’s Talk”

The Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Justice has released his year-end review, “Top Management and Performance Challenges Facing the Department of Justice.” Up there on the list of “challenges” facing the DOJ? Domestic use of drones, particularly by law enforcement. IG Michael Horowitz emphasizes that while unmanned systems will undoubtably prove to be hugely […]

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Drones vs. Shotguns: Drone Hunting in Deer Tail

Drones vs. Shotguns: Drone Hunting in Deer Tail

In one of the odder efforts to “protect” Fourth Amendment rights, a small town in Colorado has taken to the practice of “drone hunting.” Led by Phil Steel, the Deer Tail drone hunters have proposed an ordinance that seeks “to defend the sovereign airspace of the Town of Deer Trail, Colorado, and that of its […]

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Save a DARPA Researcher, Play a Video Game

Save a DARPA Researcher, Play a Video Game

In an effort to speed up the “formal verification”—the process of checking whether a design or model adheres to a certain set of requirements—the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) wants you to play online games. DARPA’s Crowd Sourced Formal Verification (CSFV) project, as per their website, “seeks to replace the intensive work done by […]

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Why Do We Love (or Hate) Drones?

Why Do We Love (or Hate) Drones?

A couple of months ago I attended DARC, the Drones and Aerial Robotics Conference, at New York University. The conference brought together a mishmash of computer nerds, drone aficionados, engineers, policy wonks and a handful of (mostly friendly) robots. One of the strangest debates—one that is playing itself out among the American public and policymakers […]

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“Hillz” Highlights: Reflections on Hillary Clinton’s Four Years as SecState

“Hillz” Highlights: Reflections on Hillary Clinton’s Four Years as SecState

Last Friday, Hillary Clinton left her post as Secretary of State as one of the most traveled secretaries of all time.  She’s leaving with an approval rating of 70%, higher than any outgoing secretary of state measured since 1948, with the exception of Colin Powell.  Clinton has said she’s going to catch up on 20 […]

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Pentagon Lifts Ban on Women in Combat

Pentagon Lifts Ban on Women in Combat

Senior defense officials stated Wednesday the Pentagon will lift the military’s ban on women in combat, thereby opening up thousands of front-line jobs to them. Not many details have been released at this time, but it is known that Panetta has implemented this change following a recommendation from the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  The change […]

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About the Author

Hannah Gais
Hannah Gais

Hannah is assistant editor at the Foreign Policy Association, a nonresident fellow at Young Professionals in Foreign Policy and the managing editor of ForeignPolicyBlogs.com. Her work has appeared in a number of national and international publications, including Al Jazeera America, U.S. News and World Report, First Things, The Moscow Times, The Diplomat, Truthout, Business Insider and Foreign Policy in Focus.

Gais is a graduate of Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass. and the Institute for Orthodox Christian Studies, where she focused on Eastern Christian Theology and European Studies. You can follow her on Twitter @hannahgais

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