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Stanley Foundation: Multilateralism as Problem Solving

Stanley Foundation: Multilateralism as Problem Solving

Vladimir Sambaiew, President of the Stanley Foundation, recently had an op-ed in the Des Moines Register that very neatly sums up the argument on how multilateralism can work to address (if not always solve) global problems. Sambaiew’s focus is on the G-20 and “responsible stakeholdership.” Two phrases help explain today’s leadership context: the “G-20” and […]

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Three Follow-Up Links

Three Follow-Up Links

Below are links to three articles that relate to previous postings here at Global Engagement: 1.  My previous post on U.S. students seeking to study full-time in the U.K. has been followed up with an article in the Washington Post, “U.S. students crossing pond for college.” The population of U.S. undergraduates at United Kingdom schools […]

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U.K. Universities Competing for U.S. Undergrads

U.K. Universities Competing for U.S. Undergrads

The Wall Street Journal recently ran an article on a small but growing number of U.S. students applying to British universities – not as study abroad but as their home institution.  The article is here.   U.S. high school and transfer students are looking at colleges outside the country as the price of an American college […]

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New Global Engagement Initiative at the Wilson Center

New Global Engagement Initiative at the Wilson Center

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars has announced a new project focused on strengthening U.S. global engagement and strategic communications (called “Strengthening America’s Global Engagement – SAGE).  Here is what they say about the project: In July 2010, the MacArthur Foundation joined with the Wilson Center to host a dinner that included key Obama […]

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Addressing Global Challenges in a New Way

Addressing Global Challenges in a New Way

Last week I attended the latest installment of the Global Challenges Forum, held in Geneva and co-chaired by the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the Talal Abu-Ghazaleh Organization.  Here is what NPS says about this effort: The Global Challenges Forum will bring together representatives from governmental and non-governmental partners to explore joint policy research […]

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Studying Global Higher Education

Studying Global Higher Education

This year the University at Albany’s (SUNY) Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies created a new organization focused on global higher education.  The Cross-Border Education Research Team (C-BERT) is co-directed by faculty members Jason Lane and Kevin Kinser.  Here is what they say about their mission and focus: Over the past two decades, there […]

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Al Qaeda in the Sahara: Don't Create Bogeymen

Al Qaeda in the Sahara: Don't Create Bogeymen

Two articles appeared in the last few days that caught my attention, both on Al Qaeda:  one about Yemen and the other about Morocco and the Western Sahara.  The New York Times had a piece last week titled Yemen’s Drive on Al Qaeda Faces Internal Skepticism and The New York Post ran an article on […]

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Cultural Diplomacy Links

Cultural Diplomacy Links

1. American Ballet Theater Return to Cuba After 50 Years 2.  Impacts:  Does Academic Exchange Matter? – Cultural Diplomacy, Scholarly Internationalism, and American Studies since World War II (Conference of the Austrian – American Educational Commission) 3.  U.S. to Send Visual Artists as Cultural Ambassadors 4.  Modern Art was a CIA ‘Weapon’ 5.  French Diplomat […]

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Elections: Necessary But Not Sufficient

Elections: Necessary But Not Sufficient

Today (Tuesday, November 2) is Election Day in the United States.  While it is an off-year for presidential elections, in my home state of New York the entire state legislature is up for election, governor, attorney general, comptroller, both US Senators (rare as they are usually staggered , but one is running for Hillary Clinton’s […]

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Women and D.I.Y Foreign Aid

Women and D.I.Y Foreign Aid

Nicholas Kristoff has an article (here) in the New York Times magazine on what he sees as a two-part trend: 1. do-it-yourself foreign aid;  and, 2.  the notable role of women in that effort.  I won’t rehash the substance of the article but it is worth asking if this D.I.Y. approach to foreign aid is a reaction […]

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Two New Blogs on the Middle East

Two New Blogs on the Middle East

There are two new blogs on that focus on the Middle East, both worth following: 1. From the Potomac to the Euphrates, by Steven A. Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations.  Cook introduces the blog with the following post: I hope the site will be a forum for readers who share my passionate interest […]

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Track II Diplomacy and Election Observers: OSCE

Track II Diplomacy and Election Observers: OSCE

Earlier this month I served as a member of the US delegation to the election observation mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (overseeing presidential, parliamentary and cantonal elections held on October 3).  The observation was implemented by the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODHIR) of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) […]

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SUNY Announces Post in International Education and Public Diplomacy

SUNY Announces Post in International Education and Public Diplomacy

The State University of New York announced that Ambassador Robert R. Gosende has been named the John W. Ryan Fellow in International Education for 2010-2011.  Here is the official SUNY press release: SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher Announces Robert Gosende as 2010-11 John W. Ryan Fellow in International Education September 10, 2010 Albany – State […]

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US Cultural Engagement: Only One of Many Voices

US Cultural Engagement: Only One of Many Voices

I came across two articles that speak volumes about the reality of how culture, particularly pop culture, is transmitted from one country to others (and how the US is much less dominant than some triumphalist voices assume and proclaim). 1.   “Soft Rock Power” in Foreign Policy reports on the work by Joel Waldfogel and Fernando […]

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David Rieff on Development Contractors in War Zones

David Rieff on Development Contractors in War Zones

I have written before about the negative effects on the US Government because of an over-reliance on contractors, especially by USAID.  But the distortion runs both ways – the organizations scrambling for and implementing those contracts are also affected.  In an article this month in The New Republic, “How NGOs Became Pawns in the War […]

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About the Author

James Ketterer
James Ketterer

James Ketterer is Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program. He previously served as Egypt Country Director for AMIDEAST, based in Cairo and before that as Vice Chancellor for Policy & Planning and Deputy Provost at the State University of New York (SUNY). In 2007-2008 he served on the staff of the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education. He previously served as Director of the SUNY Center for International Development.

Ketterer has extensive experience in technical assistance for democratization projects, international education, legislative development, elections, and policy analysis – with a focus on Africa and the Middle East. He has won and overseen projects funded by USAID, the Department for International Development (UK), the World Bank and the US State Department. He served on the National Security Council staff at the White House, as a policy analyst at the New York State Senate, a project officer with the Center for Legislative Development at the University at Albany, and as an international election specialist for the United Nations, the African-American Institute, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. He is currently a Fellow at the Foreign Policy Association and has also held teaching positions in international politics at the New School for Social Research, Bard College, State University of New York at New Paltz, the University at Albany, Russell Sage College, and the College of Saint Rose.

Ketterer has lectured and written extensively on various issues for publications including the Washington Post, Middle East Report, the Washington Times, the Albany Times Union, and the Journal of Legislative Studies. He was a Boren National Security Educational Program Fellow at Johns Hopkins University and in Morocco, an International Graduate Rotary Scholar at the Bourguiba School of Languages in Tunisia, and studied Arabic at the King Fahd Advanced School of Translation in Morocco. He received his education at Johns Hopkins University, New York University and Fordham University.

Areas of focus: Public Diplomacy; Middle East; Africa; US Foreign Policy

Contributor to: Global Engagement

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