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Updates on US and UK International Development

Updates on US and UK International Development

Two stories about important trends in international development at the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the the British equivalent, the Department for International Development (DfID): 1. Federal Times article on decreasing reliance on contractors and increasing insourcing at USAID can be found here. An excerpt: USAID is trying to rebuild a work force […]

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Slumdog Study Abroad?

Slumdog Study Abroad?

There is an excellent op-ed in today’s New York Times, Slumdog Tourism, by Kennedy Odede.  It notes the increase in “slum tourism” in places like Rio de Janeiro, Mumbai and Nairobi. Slum tourism has its advocates, who say it promotes social awareness. And it’s good money, which helps the local economy. But it’s not worth […]

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Bill to Support K-12 Language Learning

Bill to Support K-12 Language Learning

Thanks to Mark Overmann at the Alliance for International Educational and Cultural Exchange for the summary of this important legislation: Reps. Rush Holt (D-NJ) and Paul Tonko (D-NY) introduced last Friday the Excellence and Innovation in Language Learning Act (HR 6036), a bill that would authorize $400 million in funding for FY 2011 for the […]

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Development & Higher Education: USAID in Egypt

Development & Higher Education: USAID in Egypt

USAID is to be commended for creating and successfully implementing a program in Egypt that combines the best of development policy and US higher education resources.  The LEAD Program (Leadership for Education and Developoment) anually selects two students from each of Egypt’s 27 governorates to attend the American University of Cairo.  The scholarships are reserved […]

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Parliaments in Perspective: Converging and Diverging Views

Parliaments in Perspective: Converging and Diverging Views

Last weekend I attended the 9th Workshop of Parliamentary Scholars and Parliamentarians, held at Wroxton College in the UK.  The workshop is organized by the Centre for Legislative Studies at the University of Hull and co-sponsored by the Inter-Parliamentary Union and the Research Committee of Legislative Specialists of the International Political Science Association. The driving […]

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Reading Crystal Balls in Foreign Policy

Reading Crystal Balls in Foreign Policy

In May I was invited to be an observer at the Scenarios Initiative of the Center for Global Affairs (CGA) at NYU. The focus of the session I attended was Turkey’s possible futures over the next decade.  It is a fascinating and useful process, described on its website in the following way: The NYU Center […]

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Links from Around the Web

Links from Around the Web

1.  Ethiopia’s Election Results and the Myths of African Politics, by MG Zimeta in the latest edition of The Atlantic 2.  50 Years of African Independence: the Music of West Africa in Robert Nolan’s excellent FPA blog, Music and Global Affairs 3. US food aid policies create 561 jobs in Kansas, risk millions of lives […]

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Insourcing at USAID

Insourcing at USAID

_______________________________________________________________________________ Federal Times.com has a story this week about USAID’s moves to do more of their work in house instead of farming it out to contractors. The U.S. Agency for International Development plans to bring in-house more work related to program design and monitoring and evaluation, Administrator Rajiv Shah said May 5.   Shah made the […]

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Brain Circulation: The Globalization of Higher Education

Brain Circulation: The Globalization of Higher Education

Ben Wildavsky, Senior Fellow in Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, recently published an interesting book –  The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities are Reshaping the World. The book details just how globalization is making for better universities around the world and a competition among […]

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Recommended Reading: New Report on Obama's Strategic Public Engagement

Recommended Reading: New Report on Obama's Strategic Public Engagement

The Center for a New American Security has released a report by Kristin Lord of CNAS and Marc Lynch of George Washington University.   “America’s Extended Hand:  Assessing the Obama Administration’s Global Engagement Strategy,” is well worth a thorough read.   The executive summary includes: The purpose of this report is to assess rather than recommend […]

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Nuclear Links from Around the Web

Nuclear Links from Around the Web

I am interested in how the issue of nuclear non-proliferation is addressed with a variety of audiences and, to what extent, this existential discussion is driven by non-governmental organizations.   The following are a few selected links (many more are available) that highlight how this most global of matters is being engaged: 1. The Nuclear Threat […]

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Shrek, Iran and Public Diplomacy: Seeing is Believing

Shrek, Iran and Public Diplomacy: Seeing is Believing

The role of U.S. films in cultural diplomacy is not new, nor is the distribution of American films around the globe.  But those phenomena bear a reexamination every once in a while.  In this case, it is through the movie Shrek,a worldwide blockbuster (with various sequels and spin-offs).   That big green ogre has something to […]

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Boren Awards for International Study

Boren Awards for International Study

Last week I served on the national selection panel for the Boren Fellowships of the National Security Education Program (NSEP). The fellowships are for graduate students (in rare cases for recent undergrads). NSEP also runs a scholarship program for undergrads (I know less about this).  Both are administered by the Institute for International Education. Information […]

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Turkish Foreign Policy: Old and New

Turkish Foreign Policy: Old and New

Yesterday I participated in a conference on Turkish foreign policy held at the State University of New York’s Levin Institute for International Relations and Commerce in New York City.   The event was co-sponsored by SUNY’s Office of International Programs (the office that also operates the innovative and wildly successful dual diploma program between SUNY and […]

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Military Coups as a Sign of Weakness: Cook on Turkey

Military Coups as a Sign of Weakness: Cook on Turkey

Last month Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations published an excellent summary of the ongoing investigations in Turkey and how they continue to roil the politics of that country.  “The Weakening of Turkey’s Military” is available here. Those interested in the topic should also take a look at Soli Ozel’s blog at World […]

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About the Author

James Ketterer
James Ketterer

James Ketterer is Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program. He previously served as Egypt Country Director for AMIDEAST, based in Cairo and before that as Vice Chancellor for Policy & Planning and Deputy Provost at the State University of New York (SUNY). In 2007-2008 he served on the staff of the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education. He previously served as Director of the SUNY Center for International Development.

Ketterer has extensive experience in technical assistance for democratization projects, international education, legislative development, elections, and policy analysis – with a focus on Africa and the Middle East. He has won and overseen projects funded by USAID, the Department for International Development (UK), the World Bank and the US State Department. He served on the National Security Council staff at the White House, as a policy analyst at the New York State Senate, a project officer with the Center for Legislative Development at the University at Albany, and as an international election specialist for the United Nations, the African-American Institute, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. He is currently a Fellow at the Foreign Policy Association and has also held teaching positions in international politics at the New School for Social Research, Bard College, State University of New York at New Paltz, the University at Albany, Russell Sage College, and the College of Saint Rose.

Ketterer has lectured and written extensively on various issues for publications including the Washington Post, Middle East Report, the Washington Times, the Albany Times Union, and the Journal of Legislative Studies. He was a Boren National Security Educational Program Fellow at Johns Hopkins University and in Morocco, an International Graduate Rotary Scholar at the Bourguiba School of Languages in Tunisia, and studied Arabic at the King Fahd Advanced School of Translation in Morocco. He received his education at Johns Hopkins University, New York University and Fordham University.

Areas of focus: Public Diplomacy; Middle East; Africa; US Foreign Policy

Contributor to: Global Engagement

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