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Update: US Congressional Funding for Exchanges

Update: US Congressional Funding for Exchanges

http://www.alliance-exchange.org/policy-monitor/2009/12/09/exchanges-funded-635-million-fy-2010

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Cultural (Diplomacy) Requires Visa Reform

Cultural (Diplomacy) Requires Visa Reform

Last month I wrote about an interesting report from the Brookings Institution on how the US can expand cultural diplomacy with the Muslim world – and why that would be beneficial to all involved.   Now, New York University’s Center for Dialogues has released a report, “Bridging the Divide between the United States and the Muslim World through Arts […]

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Ann Stock nominated as Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs

This comes via Mark Overmann at the Alliance for International Education and Cultural Exchange: President Obama announced Friday his intent to nominate Ann Stock as the Assistant Secretary at the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Department of State. Stock’s nomination appears on the Senate record, and was also reported by the Chicago Sun-Times and by the Washington […]

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Year in Review, Part 1

Year in Review, Part 1

I am posting my thoughts on the Year in Review for issues most relevant to Global Engagement.  However, this is part 1 of 2 – Annie White will also post her thoughts.  Between the two of us you should get a pretty good sense of the year just ending and the one soon to begin. Overview:  […]

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U.S. Promises to Send More Students to China: Quality AND Quantity?

U.S. Promises to Send More Students to China: Quality AND Quantity?

Patricia Kushlis has a post in WhirledView  on President Obama’s commitment to increase the number of U.S. students going to China from the current number of 20,000 to 100,000. Her excellent post is here.  As she notes, this represents an enormous increase – in the number of US students in China and in the overall number of U.S. […]

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Senate Foreign Relations Committee Moves Aid Reform Bill

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Moves Aid Reform Bill

TheAlliance for International Education and Cultural Exchange notes [t]he Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved last week a measure that would make changes to foreign assistance programs, including the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), CQ.com and Foreign Policy.com both report. The approved bill would authorize $255 million over six years to establish a council within […]

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Cultural Diplomacy and the Muslim World: What's Old is New Again

Cultural Diplomacy and the Muslim World: What's Old is New Again

Earlier this fall the Brookings Institution published a report titled “A New Way Forward: Encouraging Greater Cultural Engagement with the Muslim World,” by Cynthia Schneider (who certainly has the qualifications to write about this topic as an art historian, former ambassador to the Hague, professor of culture and diplomacy at Georgetown and fellow at Brookings).   […]

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Economic Impact of International Students – Finding a Balance

NAFSA, the association of international educators, a released a report this week noting that “[f]oreign students and their dependents continue to make a significant contribution to local and state economies, spending $17.6 billion in the United States during the 2008- 2009 academic year…California, New York, and Texas welcomed the largest numbers of foreign students, and those states […]

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Warning Signs from the Palestinian Territories?

Steven A. Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations has a piece in The New Republic on “The Third Intifada.”  The last paragraph is a chilling summary of his excellent analysis: For Washington, which is working hard to bring Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table, the Middle East impasse is about to get a lot worse. […]

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The OSCE: Making Multilateralism Work

Yesterday, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivered a speech to the Atlantic Council to mark the twentieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.  The speech focused on the administration’s new agenda for freedom and democracy promotion, seeking a renewed US-European partnership to combat global terrorism,  human rights violations,  climate change and the spread […]

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Contracting out US Engagement with the World

I have written before about the out-of-balance role of contractors in development and in US foreign policy in general – with the hope that the ongoing QDDR will take a hard look at how much is contracted out, to what sorts of entities and with what kind of alignment with development goals and foreign policy interests.  Yesterday, […]

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Political Analysis Comes in Many Forms: Cairo's New Writers

One of the biggest mistakes any political analyst could make is to read only other political analyses.  To do so is limiting in many ways and, more importantly, just downright boring.  So, if you want to read something that is insightful and interesting, take a look at Issue 9 of A Public Space, edited by Brian Edwards of Northwestern […]

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The UN Engages Civil Society on WMD Proliferation

Yesterday I was invited to attend a civil society plenary session on UNSCR 1540 (obliging States to refrain from supporting by any means non-State actors from developing, acquiring, manufacturing, possessing, transporting, transferring or using nuclear, chemical or biological weapons and their delivery systems) at the UN organized by the Stanley Foundation .    The session was co-sponsored by the […]

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Senate Weighs in on USAID Vacancy

Josh Rogin at The Cable notes that Senators Kerry and Lugar have written to President Obama urging that a USAID administrator be appointed as soon as possible.

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Legislative Strengthening Takes Patience and Persistence

Last week I was pleased to meet with a delegation of Members of Parliament and staff from the Parliament of Ghana, who were in town as part of a USAID-supported legislative strengthening visit coordinated by the SUNY Center for International Development.While in Albany, NY they spent the week meeting with state legislators, staff from the […]

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About the Author

James Ketterer
James Ketterer

James Ketterer is Dean of International Studies at Bard College and Director of the Bard Globalization and International Affairs program. He previously served as Egypt Country Director for AMIDEAST, based in Cairo and before that as Vice Chancellor for Policy & Planning and Deputy Provost at the State University of New York (SUNY). In 2007-2008 he served on the staff of the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education. He previously served as Director of the SUNY Center for International Development.

Ketterer has extensive experience in technical assistance for democratization projects, international education, legislative development, elections, and policy analysis – with a focus on Africa and the Middle East. He has won and overseen projects funded by USAID, the Department for International Development (UK), the World Bank and the US State Department. He served on the National Security Council staff at the White House, as a policy analyst at the New York State Senate, a project officer with the Center for Legislative Development at the University at Albany, and as an international election specialist for the United Nations, the African-American Institute, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. He is currently a Fellow at the Foreign Policy Association and has also held teaching positions in international politics at the New School for Social Research, Bard College, State University of New York at New Paltz, the University at Albany, Russell Sage College, and the College of Saint Rose.

Ketterer has lectured and written extensively on various issues for publications including the Washington Post, Middle East Report, the Washington Times, the Albany Times Union, and the Journal of Legislative Studies. He was a Boren National Security Educational Program Fellow at Johns Hopkins University and in Morocco, an International Graduate Rotary Scholar at the Bourguiba School of Languages in Tunisia, and studied Arabic at the King Fahd Advanced School of Translation in Morocco. He received his education at Johns Hopkins University, New York University and Fordham University.

Areas of focus: Public Diplomacy; Middle East; Africa; US Foreign Policy

Contributor to: Global Engagement

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