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Congressional Dems Release Report on Hydraulic Fracking Substances – Some Cause Cancer

Someone broke the embargo (shame on whomever it was) on a Congressional report detailing the substances used in hydraulic fracking to produce natural gas. So, we get the news a bit early. The press release on the report starts: “Today Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Member Henry A. Waxman, Natural Resources Committee Ranking Member Edward […]

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Fukushima's Level 7 Isn't Like Chernobyl's Level 7

Minoru Oogoda of Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said this morning in Japan, “We have upgraded the severity level to 7 as the impact of radiation leaks has been widespread from the air, vegetables, tap water and the ocean.” The only other nuclear accident to reach level 7 (the highest on the IAEA’s scale) […]

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China to Start Carbon Trading in Six Regions before 2013

Thomson Reuters Point Carbon is reporting this morning that China is going to launch carbon-trading schemes in six regions before 2013. If all goes well, that will then lead to a nationwide carbon trading platform by 2015. According to the report (which is sitting behind a pay-wall or I would link to it), the areas […]

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Libyan Rebels Send First Shipment of Oil

Wednesday, a Liberian-flagged tanker sailed out of Libya’s northeastern port of Marsa al-Hariga carrying one million barrels of oil. At spot prices, this means the cargo is worth $100 million. This represents a significant milestone for the anti-Khadafy forces based in and around Benghazi in the east (formerly known as Cyrenaica). Symbolically, this provides greater […]

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Carnegie Endowment's Nuclear Conference 2011

Last week, the Carnegie Endowment held its yearly Nuclear Power Conference. As happens annually, the conference brought together hundreds of experts to discuss both civilian nuclear power and nuclear security concerns. Naturally, this year was a bit different due to the Fukushima affair. Despite the news from Japan, the consensus among the conference panelists appeared […]

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Obama Outlines US Energy Security Plan

One of the enduring security threats to the US is its dependence on imported oil. President Obama was at Georgetown University this morning to address the problem. He noted that in 2008, the US imported 11 million barrels of oil per day. His ambition is to cut that by 1/3 by 2025. I hesitate to […]

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Blue Energy – Taking Account of Water in Energy Usage

A new study from EBG Capital and the World Policy Institute may have the energy industry, policymakers and environmentalists going back to the drawing board. For years now, the debate about energy and the environment has been about carbon emissions, how green various forms of energy are. This study asks how much water is utilized […]

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Decarbonizing the North American Electrical Grid: A STEEP Hill to Climb

The US-Canadian electrical grid is one of the main sources of carbon emissions on the planet. Decarbonizing it will be a major undertaking, although the goal of cutting emissions 80% by the year 2050 is feasible. The Center for Global Affairs at New York University’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies and the Consulate General […]

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Scottish Parliament Backs Tidal Energy Project

The Scottish Parliament approved a plan late last week to build a £40 million tidal power development in the Sound of Islay, which separates the islands of Islay and Jura in the Western Isles. The installation is part of the Scottish government’s drive to generate 80% of Scotland’s energy from renewable sources by 2020. John […]

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Japan's Nuke Woes Cause Others to Reconsider Fission

The situation at the Fukushima nuclear site just keeps getting worse. If it isn’t a hydrogen explosion in one of the six reactors, it’s a fire in the spent fuel pool of another. The nuclear power industry likes to point to its safety record – years of operation without an incident. The industry’s opponents will […]

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Japan's Nuclear Meltdown – Low Probably, High Impact Risks

Keeping fingers crossed since Friday hasn’t helped avoid nuclear troubles in Japan. After Friday’s 8.9 Richter-scale earthquake and the following tsunami, a few nuclear reactors lost power, and the cooling systems failed. The facts here are elusive, but we know that pumping sea water into the reactors to cool them as is happening is a […]

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Japanese Earthquake Causes Emergencies at 2 Nuke Plants

A few hours ago, Japan got hit with an earthquake that measured 8.9 on the Richter scale, the biggest temblor in more than a century. The damage done extends to at least two nuclear power plants. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, the top civil servant in the nation, said that there was a mechanical failure […]

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Cries of “Oil Apocalypse” are Overdone

With every bit of news about instability in the Middle East, oil industry analysts get on TV and tell us that the price of oil is going to go ever higher. On one of the cable networks yesterday, I watched (with some annoyance) a discussion of gasoline hitting $5 a gallon. Over in the UK, […]

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First US Hybrid Solar-NatGas Plant Unveiled in Florida

Florida’s political bigshots spent part of the week-end at the country’s first hybrid solar/natural gas power plant. Florida Power and Light’s Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center has more than 190,000 mirrors that cover about 500 acres (202.34 hectares). The mirrors track the sun during the day to focus the sun’s rays onto water-filled pipes. […]

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Energy Blog Relaunch

Welcome to the Foreign Policy Association’s relaunched Energy Blog. As we all know, energy comes from a variety of sources with different international political-economic concerns tied each of them. Oil is affected by politics in the Middle East and affects politics around the globe. Coal and natural gas play different roles in global energy and […]

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About the Author

Jeff Myhre
Jeff Myhre

Jeff Myhre is a graduate of the University of Colorado where he double majored in history and international affairs. He earned his PhD at the London School of Economics in international relations, and his dissertation was published by Westview Press under the title The Antarctic Treaty System: Politics, Law and Diplomacy. He is the founder of The Kensington Review, an online journal of commentary launched in 2002 which discusses politics, economics and social developments. He has written on European politics, international finance, and energy and resource issues in numerous publications and for such private entities as Lloyd's of London Press and Moody's Investors Service. He is a member of both the Foreign Policy Association and the World Policy Institute.

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