Foreign Policy Blogs

Archive by Author

Profit and Blood

Profit and Blood

Mined tin ore from the Eastern DRC Advocates against illegal mining and resource-fuelled conflict gained another small victory with a leading trader of tin on the London Metal Exchange announcing that it is suspending all purchases of tin ore from the Democratic Republic of the Congo until a certification scheme can be put in place […]

read more

A gutsy pick

The very least that everyone can admit about the Nobel Committee’s pick for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize was that it is a gutsy pick.  However, that may be the only thing that everyone can agree on.  News that Barack Obama will be this year’s recipient of the world’s most distinguished humanitarian award led to […]

read more

Is the ICC biased?

Is the ICC biased?

The Christian Science Monitor posted an interesting story regarding the Annual Meeting of the International Bar Association which is currently going on this week in Madrid.  It raises the growing discontent of African states towards the International Criminal Court. At present, all four of the active situations being prosecuted by the court concern African conflicts: […]

read more

The People's Republic at 60

The People's Republic at 60

On Thursday, China marked its 60th anniversary of communist rule.  The expected parades took place in Tiananmen Square as communist party officials cheered China’s growing position as an economic powerhouse its military might.  But while the world watched the celebrations more closely than they have in the past, the publicity that the anniversary has garnered […]

read more

Eyes on Guinea

Not to pick on West Africa this week, but another human rights drama is currently unfolding in Guinea, where the military opened fire with live rounds into a crowd of 50,000 pro-democracy protesters on Monday.  While the military government claims that only 57 people were killed, mainly due to trampling, local rights groups are placing […]

read more

The Future of Human Rights in Africa

The credibility of the African regional human rights system suffered a serious setback last week when President Yahaya Jammeh of The Gambia made comments threatening human rights activists.  This is not the first time an African head of state has made disparaging remarks about human rights activists and unfortunately will probably not be the last.  […]

read more

Is there a right to knowledge?

Is there a right to knowledge?

Google Books, the ambitious plan by Sergey Brin and Larry Page to make available for free huge quantities of digitized books, suffered yet another blow on Friday as the US Department of Justice urged a federal judge to deny a settlement agreement that Google reached with authors and publishers over copyright issues.  The heart of […]

read more

The Gaza Debates Continue

The debate over Israeli and Palestinian conduct during the 2008-2009 Gaza War continues, this time with the release of the UN Human Rights Council report on the issue.  Commonly referred to as the Goldstone Report after the head of the special commission, South African jurist Richard Goldstone, the 575 page report found that both sides […]

read more

Clash of the Titans in Uganda

Uganda has made headlines this past week for violent clashes in the capital city of Kampala over development, property rights, and the traditional Buganda king. The unrest is unusual for Uganda, but highlights growing discontent with the government of Yoweri Museveni. The cause of the clashes was a planned trip by the Buganda king, King […]

read more

Maintaining the Status Quo

Maintaining the Status Quo

Stories of soldiers murdering civilians, illegal wiretapping, targeted killings of indigenous people, assassinations of labor rights activists and other human rights abuses are troubling, but not troubling enough for the US State Department.  Last week the State Department certified Colombia as complying with basic human rights requirements, a necessary condition for releasing the remainder of […]

read more

When the Police are the Problem

A recent story in The Guardian highlighted the ongoing abuses of police forces in Venezuela and the difficulties in bring about police reform.  Increasingly, police in Venezuela act with complete impunity and growing brutality against criminals, their families, and anyone else caught in between.  Stories of disappearances and false imprisonment by police, especially in Caracas, […]

read more

Through the Kazakh Looking Glass

A court in Kazakhstan sentenced a prominent human rights activist to four years imprisonment for manslaughter yesterday in a case that many observers believe was politically motivated.  The charges against Yevgeny Zhovtis stem from a car accident in July where Zhovtis hit and killed a man while driving his car.  However the initial forensic exam […]

read more

"Above all, do no harm"

The human rights group Physicians for Human Rights released a new report yesterday detailing the role that health professionals played in interrogating and torturing inmates at Guantanamo Bay.  The role of health professionals first came to light in a 2004 CIA report, but Physicians for Human Rights now claim that they played a much more […]

read more

A New Chapter in the Roma Human Rights Debate

A recent incident where Madonna was booed by concert goers after speaking out against the widespread discrimination against Roma in Romania has reignited the debate over the general treatment of Roma in Europe, particularly in Eastern Europe.  Roma, more colloquially referred to as Gypsies, have suffered rampant institutional discrimination since their arrival in Europe centuries […]

read more

Water for Diamonds

Water for Diamonds

Botswana is frequently championed for responsible use of its diamond resources in development.  In an industry too often marked with stories of brutality and exploitation, Botswana is a success story for diamonds as much as diamonds have benefited Botswana.  Supported by diamond revenues – Botswana is the largest producer in value of diamonds in the […]

read more

About the Author

Kimberly J. Curtis
Kimberly J. Curtis

Kimberly Curtis has a Master's degree in International Affairs and a Juris Doctor from American University in Washington, DC. She is a co-founder of The Women's Empowerment Institute of Cameroon and has worked for human rights organizations in Rwanda and the United States. You can follow her on Twitter at @curtiskj

Areas of Focus: Transitional justice; Women's rights; Africa

americasdiplomats_socialmediaasset

Blog Authors

FPA Administrator