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South Korea’s American Century

South Korea’s American Century

More than any other nation, America helped create today’s Republic of Korea (ROK). A U.S.-led U.N. coalition defended the South following the North’s invasion in June 1950. It negotiated the terms of the armistice signed sixty years ago this month. It defended the ROK as a communist frontline through the latter half of the 20th […]

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Can Snowden Stop a Trade Agreement?

Can Snowden Stop a Trade Agreement?

The impact of Edward Snowden’s revelations is broadening in scope. When his initial leaks appeared in late May, they were greeted as a forcing event. Whether one saw Snowden as a patriot or a traitor – he’s certainly a lawbreaker – his revelations appeared to be an attempt to bookend the changes in intelligence policy […]

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U.S. Lessons for Europe’s Federalists?

U.S. Lessons for Europe’s Federalists?

In the  July/August 2013 issue of Foreign Affairs, Nicolas Berggruen and Nathan Gardels outline a blueprint for moving toward a more federal European Union. Berggruen and Gardels argue that Europe’s economic future depends on a more federal union. Direct election for the EU presidency, reforming the European Parliament, and reconstituting the European Council as a […]

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Foreign Policy in Theory and Practice

Foreign Policy in Theory and Practice

  “Events, dear boy, events.” British Prime Minister Harold MacMillan’s response when asked what he most feared is one of the most popular quotes among foreign policy scholars. How and whether to respond to the ongoing violence in Syria is now the barometer of President Obama’s foreign policy posture. Is it isolationist or interventionist? The […]

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Doubts about Data (and Debt)

Doubts about Data (and Debt)

  In a 2010 study, Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff identified a 90 percent debt/GDP threshold as a “red line” national economies crossed only at the cost of impeding their growth. That study garnered a great deal of attention among debt hawks. More has been written about the impact of recent academic work discrediting Reinhart/Rogoff’s core conclusion […]

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Europe’s Ghosts

Europe’s Ghosts

The struggle to keep the Eurozone intact threatens the future of a united Europe. It is not, however, the only threat the EU faces, and perhaps not even the primary one. Robert Kaplan, in a new essay (“Europe’s New Map” for The American Interest) gives proponents of a robust EU additional reasons to worry. Many of […]

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Defending “The World America Made”

Defending “The World America Made”

Earlier this month, two prominent figures in the defense community – Retired Gen. David Petraeus and Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon, wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post promoting reforms to the energy, manufacturing and IT sectors, among others, that they argue would ensure a bright American future. It is not too surprising that […]

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This Is Not a Review of “This Is Not a Film”

This Is Not a Review of “This Is Not a Film”

This Is Not a Film, the 2011 documentary by Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, recently and belatedly worked its way to the top of my Netflix queue. The film was smuggled out of Iran for submission to the 2011 Cannes Film Festival before Panahi’s six-year prison sentence and 20-year ban from filmmaking was upheld late that […]

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Why Cyprus Matters

Why Cyprus Matters

To American policymakers working through the sequester, Cyprus’ 10 billion euro bailout must sound like a rounding error. Context is key: the amount equals nearly half of Cyprus’ annual GDP. Euro-watchers first warned that the disjointed political path to the bailout agreement  — including a proposed tax on all Cyprus bank deposits — adds to the […]

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“Emperor”: American Swagger, Hollywood Style

“Emperor”: American Swagger, Hollywood Style

The new film “Emperor” tells the story of how America made the first key decision of its post-World War II occupation of Japan: the fate of Emperor Hirohito. Gen. Douglas MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) and his staff are landing in Tokyo as the film opens, ready to display some “good ol’ American swagger” and establish […]

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“Keynes v. Hayek,” or “Keynes/Hayek”?

“Keynes v. Hayek,” or “Keynes/Hayek”?

Nicholas Whapshott’s 2011 book Keynes Hayek: The Clash That Defined Modern Economics, is a useful primer for those looking to understand the careers and philosophies of the two foundational economists. Perhaps its most striking insight is that neither seemed as absolute about the fact that his philosophy fit all times as the followers of both […]

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Growth, Trade and the Transatlantic Partnership

Growth, Trade and the Transatlantic Partnership

  In the U.S., sequestration threatens a shaky recovery. In the eurozone, unemployment rose to record levels this week. In response, both sides of the Transatlantic partnership are recasting what was traditionally a strategic partnership as an economic one, aimed at enhancing global security by facilitating economic growth. For the past several years, economic anxiety […]

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Does a Pope Need a Foreign Policy?

Does a Pope Need a Foreign Policy?

  When the last conclave that elected Pope Benedict XVI was underway, a colleague stopped by my office and remarked on CNN’s seemingly nonstop coverage. My non-Catholic colleague’s point boiled down to: “I don’t get it. Why should we care about this?” Stipulating that the world’s many Catholics care deeply, why should it matter to […]

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Thoughts on Zero Dark Thirty

Thoughts on Zero Dark Thirty

Zero Dark Thirty was among the few of the year’s major Oscar-nominated films that I had not seen, so I went earlier this month, somewhat reluctantly. Many far more informed than I (including Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), John McCain (R-AZ) and Carl Levin (D-MI) in a letter to the CIA, as well as Steve Coll in the […]

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Obama’s EU Inbox

Obama’s EU Inbox

Just prior to the inauguration, The Brookings Institution released a briefing book, “Big Bets and Black Swans,” examining the key foreign policy challenges President Obama faces as he begins his second term. The section on the Eurozone, written by Justin Vaiesse  and Thomas Wright — identifies a potential euro failure as a “black swan” — […]

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About the Author

Michael Crowley
Michael Crowley

Mike Crowley received his MA with distinction from The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in American Foreign Policy and European Studies in 2003 and his MFA in Classical Acting from The Shakespeare Theatre Company/George Washington University in 2016. He has worked at the Center for Strategic International Studies, Akin Gump, and The Pew Charitable Trusts. He's an actor working in Washington, DC and a volunteer at the National Gallery of Art, and he looks for ways to work both into his blog occasionally.

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