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FPA Blogs and Russia's Resurgence and Georgia's Significance

FPA Blogs and Russia's Resurgence and Georgia's Significance

Good Friday, Friday Good. Today I want to take some time out and showcase some of the excellent work done by other FPA writers and bloggers that either directly or indirectly affect Central Asia, most involving the Georgia-Russia conflict. FPA contributer Marco Vicenzino has written two solid analyses of a Reassertive Russia Part I, Part […]

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Kazakhstan's Reform Progress before the OSCE Chairmanship

On July 22, just days before the Russian-Georgia conflict, US Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asian Affairs Richard Boucher spoke before the OSCE Helsinki Commission regarding Kazakhstan's democratic and human rights progress before their scheduled 2010 OSCE Chairmanship. Before we get into how the US views their progress so far, it's never a bad […]

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SCO Annual Summit

SCO Annual Summit

It's that time of year again. The Shanghai Cooperation Organization Annual Summit! The meeting will be held in Dushanbe, Tajikistan on August 28, and foreign ministers from all six of its member states have already concluded a meeting going over a few topics to be discussed at the larger summit. The group of ministers decided […]

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Chaos amid Construction

Chaos amid Construction

Two interrelated items today for your viewing pleasure. Descent Into Chaos We have already discussed Ahmed Rashid's new book Descent into Chaos: The US and the Failure of Nation Building in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Central Asia, but in light of changing events, Musharraf's resignation (here is an editorial by Rashid about Musharraf's leaving), the worsening […]

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Afghanistan: The Right War Afterall?

For the past few months, the war in Afghanistan has been seen as the ‘Right War’ by the American politicians and media. John McCain and Barack Obama both have called for greater troop strength in the conflict and have shown unwavering support in the US/NATO mission there; to defeat the insurgency/Taliban and create a viable, […]

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Drawing a Line: The West's Difficult Choice in Georgia

On this page, we have constantly debated between realist and idealist foreign policies regarding the West and Central Asia. The West's liberal/democratic rhetoric and policy of democracy promotion comes in stark contrast to Russia and China's movements throughout the world, and this is easily seen in Central Asia. In this same regard, we have discussed […]

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Diplomacy: Senators, Breakfast, and Weapons in My Apartment

Diplomacy: Senators, Breakfast, and Weapons in My Apartment

Who's got a craving for some diplomacy?! I know I do. Here are a couple items of interest. Senate Majority leader Harry Reid and four other US senators are near the end of a diplomatic trip to Germany, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. This trip did not have quite the fan fare as Obama's recent overseas visit, […]

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Georgia-Russian War – Implications for Central Asia and the World

Thankfully, a cease-fire in the Russian-Georgian conflict over the South Ossetia and Abkhazia territories has been agreed upon by both states, unfortunately fighting still seems to be occurring in the Georgian city of Gori. The conflict in Georgia has ramifications in Central Asia and for its nations’ governments in many important ways. As former Soviet […]

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Xinjiang Province: Terror Across Central Asia

Xinjiang Province: Terror Across Central Asia

Well it looks like I didn't live up to my promise, but better late than never right?  The Olympics in China have made quite a splash; in the pool, in the Caucasus's, Bush's speeches and church visit, and in the Xinjiang Province, where on Sunday a multitude of attacks occurred all over the city of […]

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EU-Central Asia Strategy One Year Anniversary

The European Union's ‘Strategy for a New Partnership with Central Asia‘ has now passed its 1st year of existence and therefore must immediately be judged!  Here are its original stated goals and origins and here is a one year assessment by ISN's Robert M Cutler.  Now the 'strategy’ is a decade long process that hopefully […]

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More Troops, More Speeches, and Oh Look at the Pretty Pink Color!

More Troops, More Speeches, and Oh Look at the Pretty Pink Color!

Defense Secretary Bob Gates has announced the US support for doubling the Afghan army to 120,000 troops in the next five years, a plan initially proposed by the Afghan government. The plan will require about $20 Billion dollars, which will mostly be paid by the US, but there will be some assistance from other NATO […]

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China's Xinjiang Province: Openness Versus Resiliency

China's Xinjiang Province: Openness Versus Resiliency

Xinjiang Shakeup Since Tuesday's terrorist attack on Chinese border patrol in Xinjiang Province's city of Kashgar, things have gotten rather tense in the region, as exile groups have claimed that China's government has sped up the detainment of suspected 'separatists and increased its presence of paramilitary forces as the Olympics draws near. The region's ethnic […]

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Poppies for the Poor

Poppies for the Poor

With the Taliban showcasing great ‘tenacity‘ and ability to recruit new members from around the region to replace those lost, one must conclude that the Afghan government and its International supporters are in a fight for their lives. Hard decisions will have to made for them to win, including the eradication of the nation's poppy […]

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Child Labor in Central Asia

Child Labor in Central Asia

Gulnoza Saidazimova of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty about a month ago catalogued the child labor situation in Central Asia. Unfortunately child labor is abused in all most all Central Asian states, but in different ways and to different degrees. Saidazimova first discusses Tajikistan's use of child labor as a ‘lifeline for their families’ who are […]

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President Bush Standing Tall and Standing Down in Central Asia

Yesterday, all Bush's problems seemed so far away. But now it looks as China's authoritarian government is here to stay. The Chinese are shall we say displeased about the US House of Representatives resolution requesting China to honor their IOC commitments in regard to human rights, internet blocking, and treatment of its Tibetan and Uighur […]

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About the Author

Patrick Frost
Patrick Frost

Patrick Frost recently graduated from New York University's Masters Program in Political Science - International Relations. His MA thesis analyzed the capabilities and objectives of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization in Central Asia and beyond and explored how these affected U.S. interests and policy.

Areas of Focus:
Eurasia, American Foreign Policy, Ideology, SCO

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