Foreign Policy Blogs

Archive by Author

Media Clamp Down in Kyrgyzstan

In early December, Kyrgyzstan's state radio took off the air US-funded Radio Free Europe ‘Radio Azattyk’ without providing any explanation. It has also been reported that BBC programming was also taken off the air. It appears that the Kyrgyz state is clenching a vice on domestic and international media outlets, forcing its citizens to only […]

read more

Do Not Pass!

Do Not Pass!

I apologize for my absent of late as I was spending the holidays way up in Alaska with my family, including my new niece.  There has been much happening in our Central Asian region of the world and I will try to discuss all the recent happenings as soon as possible. Before the holidays took […]

read more

Embarrassing Attack From Many Directions

Embarrassing Attack From Many Directions

It is amazing how one incident, at times, can symbolize so much. Weeks ago, on November 27, in northwest Afghanistan, Taliban forces ambushed a large convoy of Afghan soldiers and policemen, killing 14, wounding 27, kidnapping another 20, and destroying or stealing over 20 vehicles. How could such a successful attack occur against soldiers and […]

read more

Afghanistan: Alternative Supply Routes

Afghanistan: Alternative Supply Routes

As the Kyber Pass and other transportation lanes through Pakistan into Afghanistan have become increasingly subjected to Taliban and insurgent attacks, NATO has looked to alternative routes. In just the last week or so there have been at least 3 separate attacks on NATO supplies inside of Pakistan, including one incident where hundreds of NATO […]

read more

"Come Together, Right Now" Over Afghanistan

The foreign minister of Afghanistan met with his regional counterparts on Sunday in Paris to discuss closer cooperation in terms of narcotics trafficking, counterterrorism measures, and how to stabilize the country. The conference was brought together by France's Foreign Minister Bernard Koucher who asserted: "There is a consensus that there can be no peace, security […]

read more

Turkmenistan Parliamentary Election

Turkmenistan Parliamentary Election

On Sunday, the a reported 94% of the people of Turkmenistan participated in the nation's 4th Mejlis (parliamentary) elections. Turkmenistan's government run Central Election Commission called the vote a great success and ‘historic.’ The election is supposed to represent a more open and democratic Turkmenistan, as the country's President Berdymukhamedov earlier this year reformed the […]

read more

Afghan-Russia War Compared to Today's NATO-Taliban Conflict

I just finished watching Questar's Modern Warfare ‘Russia in Afghanistan’ documentary and it contained some great and dramatic footage of the ten year war, which ended in yet another defeat of a world power in the Hindu Kush. Many elements of this bygone war are strikingly similar to the current NATO/Afghan government led war against […]

read more

Year in Review: Predictions for 2009

Making predictions is a fool's man's game…thankfully I love that game! While one cannot foresee what exactly the future holds, some trends can be seen. For instance, it is hard to foresee any changes in the political leadership of all the Stans’, as they are all deeply entrenched and seem to have learned much from […]

read more

Year in Review: Misconceptions and Understatements

In the second to last installment of our Central Asian Year in Review I want to discuss two things: Issues and events in the CA region that have lacked media coverage commensurate with their importance and common misconceptions about our subject area. Afghanistan is at the heart of both. The story that has received the […]

read more

Financial Crisis in Central Asia: Year in Review

Today, in the second part of our Central Asia: Year in Review, we will discuss the global recession's impact on our region. A couple weeks ago, I went over Kazakhstan's sickening economy and their government's early efforts to stem the tide, while at the same time drawing a connection to how Kazakh and the rest […]

read more

Central Asia 2008: Year in Review

Central Asia 2008: Year in Review

Just a few days ago I was jotting down some of the major happenings in the Afghanistan and Central Asian region this past year and a few significant items came to mind, but it was not until I went over my resources, news clippings, and former posts did I realize that there were stories everywhere.  […]

read more

Predictions from Year's Past

Predictions from Year's Past

My predecessor Bonnie Boyd completed a 2007 Central Asia Year in Review which you can find to your right and here. She made predictions regarding the CA region for 2008 and since that year is nearly come to pass, how bout we go over them? No, you don't want to? Well, too bad, I’m gonna […]

read more

US Review of the Afghanistan Conflict

US Review of the Afghanistan Conflict

I have been little by little discussing an extensive review of the Afghanistan conflict by the Bush Administration and it finally looks like bits of the actual report have begun to surface. The review was headed by War czar Lt. Gen Douglas Lute and included many expert voices from inside and outside government and was […]

read more

Kazakhstan: 'From Nomads to Central Asian Tigers'

Yesterday morning, I attended a lecture and discussion led by Tatyana Zhukova titled ‘From Nomads to Central Asian Tigers’ about her home country of Kazakhstan at the World Affairs Council – San Diego. Zhukova, an ethnic Russian, worked for several years as an economic specialist for the US embassy in Kazakhstan and recently moved to […]

read more

India-Pakistan: Afghanistan Is Not in the Middle, But Its Pretty Darn Close

India-Pakistan: Afghanistan Is Not in the Middle, But Its Pretty Darn Close

The rising political tensions between India and Pakistan are having a direct impact on Afghanistan and the rest of Central Asia. The two regional powers have traded influence in Afghanistan to try and outmaneuver the other and it is Pakistan's security apparatus's greatest fear right now that India currently has the upper-hand with US-backed Karzai […]

read more

About the Author

Patrick Frost
Patrick Frost

Patrick Frost recently graduated from New York University's Masters Program in Political Science - International Relations. His MA thesis analyzed the capabilities and objectives of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization in Central Asia and beyond and explored how these affected U.S. interests and policy.

Areas of Focus:
Eurasia, American Foreign Policy, Ideology, SCO

americasdiplomats_socialmediaasset

Blog Authors

FPA Administrator