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Kazakhstan-US: Academic Shenanigins

Good morning everyone. Hey, has anyone of you been writing academic reports analyzing another nation's society and political system, while at the same time taking money from that country's government to do so? If you said yes, you may be Johns Hopkins University's Central Asia-Caucasus Institute, which is directed by the much respected S. Frederick […]

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Aid Worker Attacks in Afghanistan: Taliban Strategy

Aid Worker Attacks in Afghanistan: Taliban Strategy

Two days ago, a French aid worker was the latest to be targeted by Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan. In this case the aid worker, who was reportedly an education specialist from an unknown NGO, was kidnapped by a small group of Taliban members, who in the process killed a young Afghan civilian. Reportedly 19 humanitarian […]

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Afghanistan and the Election: 'Good Luck!'

Afghanistan and the Election: 'Good Luck!'

In honor of Election Day here in America, how about we remind the two presidential candidates of a tremendously volatile and challenging issue they will all of a sudden be responsible for; Afghanistan/Pakistan democracy and stability. President-elect Obama or McCain will face quite the number of tests, and defeating the Taliban and Al Qaeda, bringing […]

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Iran and the SCO: Always a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride

Iran and the SCO: Always a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride

Just last Thursday, Kazakhstan's thriving capitol, Astana, hosted the Shanghai Cooperation Organization's Heads of Government Council meeting. I could not find many reports about what was accomplished at the meeting besides the official statement from the group's website, which was drier than a drought in the Sahara's. The official statement reported that the group's members […]

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Afghanistan's Disabled (with a little hope on the side)

In all the violent incidents that have plagued the people of Afghanistan in its recent history, many have died, but even more have been permanently maimed and disabled. Below is a remarkable video about some of the Afghani disabled and their struggle for rights and services: Because the New York Times, who produced this video, […]

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US Pakistani Raids from Afghanistan

Yesterday, I made a statement that it appeared that the Pakistani government was implicitly alright with the use of US drone predator missile attacks in their territory, as long they avoided civilian casualties. While according to statements by Pakistan's Foreign Ministry and several members of the country's ruling coalition, this is not completely true. The […]

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Afghanistan/Pakistan Conflict Developments

Afghanistan/Pakistan Conflict Developments

Today I would like to go over recent developments in the conflict spanning the Afghan-Pakistan border as the conflict's many sides (NATO, Afghans, Taliban, Pakistan military, Al Qaeda, and local tribes) have all recently been in the news for various reasons: The Bush administration has authorized even greater use of missile/drone attacks inside of Pakistan, […]

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Who's Afraid of Tariq Ramadan? Not me, well…maybe just a little

Who's Afraid of Tariq Ramadan?  Not me, well…maybe just a little

Hello everyone, it's Pat Frost from FPA's Central Asian blog doing a guest post. Now this piece is far from ripped off the front page headlines, but the issue is still as vibrant as ever and continually is debated in my mind: Is Tariq Ramadan, a European Muslim with an elite Islamic past (he is […]

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Central Asian Regional Water Sharing Deal Reached

Central Asian Regional Water Sharing Deal Reached

Ever since the Soviet Union's collapse, the region of Central Asia, flush with newly minted states, has struggled to come up with a regional water arrangement to suit all those involved. In recent weeks, the region's governmental leaders have been working on a short-term water sharing deal, and it now appears their work has come […]

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Afghanistan's Women in Charge

Continuing yesterday's thread, I would like to highlight one major aspect of progress in Afghanistan; the role of women in the workplace and in society as a whole. To do this I will showcase the stories of a few particular women, and unfortunately in their stories there is great suffering and too visible of signs […]

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A Public Relations Makeover for Afghanistan

If you read most of the news and editorial pieces I posted on Monday, you probably have a negative outlook on the stability and chances for progress in Afghanistan, and for the most part, rightly so. But there are positive things going on in the country, things that before 2001 probably seemed impossible to most […]

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Kyrgyzstan: Boucher Schmoozing

Kyrgyzstan's capital of Bishkek, which just last week hosted a Commonwealth of Independent States CIS summit, was the site of a meeting between US Assistant Secretary of State Richard Boucher and President Bakiyev and a following news conference. Boucher stated that the two sides discussed security and energy relations and issues. Specifically, the US sponsored […]

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Afghanistan in the News

Afghanistan in the News

The ways the world's leading newspapers have covered NATO's efforts in Afghanistan and the situation on the ground there have morphed several times in recent years. After taking a backseat to the War in Iraq for nearly 4 years, the Afghan conflict came back into the mainstream about a year ago, mainly with statements that […]

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Xinjiang Muslims, the Chinese Government, and the Permission to Preach

Xinjiang Muslims, the Chinese Government, and the Permission to Preach

How does one reconcile the governmental promotion of atheism in a society with strongly entrenched religious beliefs and customs? The Chinese communist government has tried to square this circle for years now, and the Xinjiang Province's Uighur Muslim majority has proven its greatest challenge. Edward Wong of the New York Times explores this societal conflict […]

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Christianity in Central Asia

Most of you have probably heard the reports of Christian-targeted violence in Iraq in recent weeks. Religious minorities face many uphill battles, some higher and harsher than others, in most societies. Just this last week we heard people, though on a very marginal scale, at McCain rallies shouting derogatory Muslim references toward Barack Obama. It […]

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About the Author

Patrick Frost
Patrick Frost

Patrick Frost recently graduated from New York University's Masters Program in Political Science - International Relations. His MA thesis analyzed the capabilities and objectives of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization in Central Asia and beyond and explored how these affected U.S. interests and policy.

Areas of Focus:
Eurasia, American Foreign Policy, Ideology, SCO

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