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A Blow to the Reformist Movement?

Two of Iran’s opposition leaders, Mohammed Khatami and Mehdi Karroubi, have apparently dropped their demand for a new presidential election, saying that while they still believe the vote in June was fraudulent, they accept Mahmoud Ahmadinejad as the head of state. Mehdi Karroubi is a former presidential candidate, who has been very vocal in his […]

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Persian Gulf? Arabian Gulf?

The Islamic Solidarity Games, which were to be held in Iran in April, have been called off because the countries could not agree on what to call the Persian Gulf. The Iranian organizers used the words “Persian Gulf” on the planned logo and medals, angering the Arab countries who call it Arabian Gulf.  This debate […]

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Looking Back at 2009

As 2010 starts, the same two stories that dominated the headlines in 2009 are in the news already. The post-election protests and the ongoing game of nuclear brinkmanship are still continuing. Here is an AFP video that highlights the major events that took place in Iran in 2009, giving us an insight as to what […]

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Iran: Year in Review

Iran: Year in Review

Overview: Iran dominated the headlines in 2009. While Iranians inspired us with their fight for their right to have fair elections, the Iranian government kept on disappointing us with their crackdown on post-election protests and their controversial nuclear program. The 2009 Iranian presidential election between Ahmadinejad and Moussavi generated an unprecedented level of anticipation. The […]

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Turkey in the Middle

The United States is not taking the support offered by the Turkish Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, to the Iranian nuclear program lightly (Here is a previous blog I wrote on this topic).  This week as the Turkish prime minister met with President Obama in Washington D.C., Iran’s nuclear program was very much a topic of […]

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Seriously Iran? Seriously?

Last week, the Wall Street Journal ran a story that showed just how desperate the Iranian government is getting. If harassing Iranian protesters living in Iran was not enough, the Iranian authorities are now threatening Iranians living abroad. As the article states: In recent months, Iran has been conducting a campaign of harassing and intimidating […]

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Surprise on the FP Top 100 Global Thinkers

This year, newspapers all around the world have been dominated by one topic: Iranian post-election turmoil.  Therefore, it is not surprising that an Iranian reformist leader is on the Foreign Policy Top 100 Global Thinkers. Though it is a pleasant surprise that the person is Zahra Rahnavard, wife of Mir Hossein Mousavi.   Here is what […]

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When Fake News Meets Reality

Just in case you missed it, Maziar Bahari was on the Daily Show on Monday night. Bahari, a Newsweek reporter, was arrested in the aftermath of the Iranian election and kept captive for 118 days. When John Stewart commented, “You were imprisoned in Iran…” Bahari replied, “Yes. Because of you.” While it sounds ridiculous, it […]

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More on the Hostile Relationship between Iran and Saudi Arabia

Here is a quick analysis presented by the Link TV on the growing tensions between Iran and Saudia Arabia over Yemen’s conflict between the government forces (backed by the Saudis) and the Houthi rebels (supported by Iran). The report also answers questions like why did Arab satellites carriers drop Iranian Al Alam TV? And will […]

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Watch PBS Tonight

Today, on your local PBS channel, Frontline will have a documentary investigating Iran’s controversial election and how Neda Agha Soltan became a potent symbol for the reform movement.  Frontline has a press release that provides more detail on this documentary: FRONTLINE INVESTIGATES THE CONTROVERSIAL IRANIAN ELECTION AND THE DEATH OF ONE YOUNG PROTESTER SEEN AROUND […]

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An Antipathetic Relationship

Continuing with the theme of the troubled relationship between Iran and Saudi Arabia, especially over Yemen, here is an Al Jazeera report examining how Yemenis are reacting to foreign interference in their country’s civil war: [kml_flashembed movie=”http://www.youtube.com/v/ybK4-DveFQ8″ width=”425″ height=”350″ wmode=”transparent” /] On Sunday, Ali Larijani, the speaker of the Iranian parliament,  criticized the Saudi government […]

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Yemen: Another Proxy State

Looks like a conflict that started out as a local civil war in the Northern Yemen is now turning to a full proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran. The feud involves the Shiite Houthi clan supported by Iran and the Sunni Yemeni government backed by Saudi Arabia. In October, Yemeni officials supposedly seized an […]

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Sistan Baluchestan Examined

Last month, Iran was shaken by a suicide attack in its province, Sistan Baluchestan.  The attack killed more than 42 people, including 15 members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards.  Here is an Al Jazeera report that examines the root causes of discontent in this province: [kml_flashembed movie=”http://www.youtube.com/v/bySZvaQMv5w” width=”425″ height=”350″ wmode=”transparent” /] The report reveals that lack […]

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Turkey and Iran: A Growing Alliance

In the Muslim world, Turkey and Iran are usually perceived as standing on opposite sides.  Turkey stands for secularism, while the Shia clerics dominate the Iranian politics.  Turkey is a “friend of the West”, and is also a Muslim country that has normal relations with Israel. While Iran, if it is not in the news […]

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Iranian Nuclear Program: A Quick Recapitulation of Last Week

It feels like the last couple of days, each morning bought a new story about the Iranian nuclear program. Is Iran cooperating or not? How did their meeting with the IAEA go? What are the Iranian leaders saying about the ElBradei deal? How is the United States responding to Iran’s equivocation? Here is a quick […]

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About the Author

Sahar Zubairy

Sahar Zubairy recently graduated from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas- Austin with Masters in Global Policy Studies. She graduated from Texas A&M University with Phi Beta Kappa honors in May 2006 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics. In Summer 2008, she was the Southwest Asia/Gulf Intern at the Henry L. Stimson Center, where she researched Iran and the Persian Gulf. She was also a member of a research team that helped develop a website investigating the possible effects of closure of the Strait of Hormuz in the Persian Gulf by Iran.

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