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The Larijanis Brothers: People to Watch Out in Iranian Politics

The Larijanis Brothers: People to Watch Out in Iranian Politics

All five Larijani brothers have made a mark in the Iranian politics.  In Will Iran’s ‘Kennedys’ Challenge Ahmadinejad?, Robin Wright writes: Over the past 30 years, the five sons of a senior cleric have been a major force in Iran’s power structure, either serving in or running for positions including the presidency and various diplomatic […]

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Problem with Criticizing Iran’s Human Rights Record

In his op-ed for the Wall Street Journal, Mr. Alexander Benard urges the United States to “propose a conversation with Iran about human rights” instead of negotiating with Iran on its nuclear program.  His reasoning is simple: Focusing on Iranian nuclear program will ignite patriotism in Iranian people and they will “in large part rally […]

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An Election Promise Kept

As discussed in my previous post, Iranian Women: Voices to be Heard, women have played a prominent role in the pre-election campaigning and the post-election protests.  All four candidates made promises to women in the election campaign, including Ahmadinejad, who spoke of empowering women.  It looks like this is one election promise that Ahmadinejad is […]

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Persian Culture and Iranian Psyche

Persian Culture and Iranian Psyche

There is no denying that Iran has one of the best literary heritages.  From Rumi to Hafez to Omer Khayyam to Saadi, Iran has had its share of great poets.  Though the most influential poet remains Ferdowsi, known for writing the Persian epic, the Shahnameh (known in English as The Book of Kings).  This article […]

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When will Iran make the Nuclear Bomb?

Apparently never.  The answer comes from applying the “rational actor” game theory to this question.  Game theory is a branch of applied mathematics, often used in the social sciences, to study how people will behave in strategic situations– a situation in which an individual’s success in making decisions depends on the decisions of others (think […]

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Why Saying "U.S. Diplomacy will fail with Iran" is Wrong

Considering that in his last op-ed for the New York Times, Mr. Luttwak stated that the Muslim world will not accept Obama due to his “conversion to Christianity” (Muslim countries’ approval of U.S. leadership has increased under Obama’s presidency), it is no surprise that his op-ed published today in the Wall Street Journal on why […]

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Going Beyond the Numbers

Today a senior Iranian official admitted that about 4,000 people were detained in June’s post-election street protests.  Judiciary spokesman Ali-Reza Jamshidi stated that 3700 detainees arrested during post-election incidents have been released and only 300 people were held for longer than a few days for being “involved in the riots.”  Among those 300 people are […]

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Iran and Taliban: A Marriage of Convenience?

There is nothing in Iran and Taliban’s past relationship, which leads one to believe that these two sides can cooperate.  Taliban’s hardcore theology includes anti-Shiite prejudice that often bought it to the brink of war with Iran during its days in power.  On August 8th 1998, Taliban killed eleven Iranian diplomats and carried out a […]

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Another Round of “Confessions”

Another Round of “Confessions”

While the second day of the trial of protesters arrested in post-election turmoil in Iran might not have provided the same shock level as the day one of the trial, it still had its share of extremely interesting confessions.  Though in today’s hearing no one accused high-level reformist leaders of conspiring against the Islamic Republic, […]

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What the US Intelligence is Saying about Iran?

A newly disclosed document- answers to questions for the record submitted by the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) to the Senate Intelligence Committee in April 2009 – has revealed that Iran is at least four years away from producing nuclear weapon and Iran has been secretly helping the Afghan insurgents including the Taliban.  The Washington […]

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A Cooling Relationship

As Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is officially inaugurated as the President, the question on everyone’s mind is what does the future hold for Iran.  The one thing that is confirmed is the election crisis is far from being over.  Ahmadinejad’s reformist opponents, along with the two former presidents and notable members of the family of Ayatollah Khomeini, […]

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Ahmadinejad's Inauguration

Ahmadinejad's Inauguration

President Ahmadinejad was sworn in for his second term by the country’s parliament today.  Once again the ceremony had notable absentees.  The New York Times reported that all but 13 of the 70 lawmakers forming a reformist bloc in Parliament were absent from the inauguration, and some of those who did attend walked out as […]

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Supporting MEK: Not a Step in the Right Direction

Today the Washington Times reported that the United States is discreetly trying to stop Iraq from closing the Camp Ashraf, home to over 3,000 Mujahedeen-e Khalq (MEK) members.  As discussed in my previous blog, MEK is regarded by both the Iranian and the U.S. government as a terrorist group.  The group had been operating from […]

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It’s Official

It’s Official

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei officially endorsed President Ahmadinejad on Monday for his second term in office.  Ahmadinejad was declared the victor of the disputed elections that took place on June 12th in which he allegedly won almost two-thirds of the vote.  In the ceremony marking the official start of his second term in office, Ahmadinejad […]

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An Update

An Update

Here is an update on some of the stories I have previously blogged on: 1) Iran’s Role in the Latin America (July 30) The Iranian lawmakers have questioned the $280 million loan given to Bolivia.  Their disapproval arises due to the Article 80 of the Iranian Constitution, which states that the Parliament must first approve […]

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About the Author

Sahar Zubairy

Sahar Zubairy recently graduated from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas- Austin with Masters in Global Policy Studies. She graduated from Texas A&M University with Phi Beta Kappa honors in May 2006 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics. In Summer 2008, she was the Southwest Asia/Gulf Intern at the Henry L. Stimson Center, where she researched Iran and the Persian Gulf. She was also a member of a research team that helped develop a website investigating the possible effects of closure of the Strait of Hormuz in the Persian Gulf by Iran.

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