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After Years of Escalating Violence, Juarez Calms

After Years of Escalating Violence, Juarez Calms

There were 48 homicides in Cuidad Juarez in July, according to the Washington Post: “33 by gun, seven by beatings, six by strangulation and two by knife.” Forty of the murders are attributed to drug violence. Bad as that sounds, it represents a 70% reduction in the number of murders in the city still widely […]

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How Brazil Coaxed Foxconn to Set Up Shop Near Sao Paulo

How Brazil Coaxed Foxconn to Set Up Shop Near Sao Paulo

In the 1980s, Japanese carmakers began to move production to the United States. Today, they — along with German and South Korean makers — account for more than 40% of the autos made in the United States. The move begs a question, taken up by a recent New York Times article: Could consumer electronics makers […]

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Needed: New Thinking on ‘New Authoritarianism’

Needed: New Thinking on ‘New Authoritarianism’

The Washington Post’s Juan Forero recently published an article on the erosion of democratic institutions in Latin America. Among the “new authoritarians” he cites as responsible for the decline are Hugo Chavez and several of his key allies, namely Ecuador’s Rafael Correa, Bolivia’s Evo Morales and Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega. All of them have ridden roughshod […]

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Mexico’s Economic Rebound: Good News, Bad News

Mexico’s Economic Rebound: Good News, Bad News

  Recently, the general gloom about Mexico has been replaced by a bit of positive reportage. Mexico’s economy grew faster than Brazil’s last year, and it is set to do so again in 2012. Largely, that’s because NAFTA is once again paying dividends for Mexico. Higher wages in China and volatile transport costs have made Mexico the […]

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Flawed Assumptions About the Next Energy Boom

Flawed Assumptions About the Next Energy Boom

Behold, Foreign Policy has announced “a new golden age of oil and gas.” Here’s the good news: unlike previous booms this one stands to benefit a wide swath of humanity, including places as far flung as the Canary Islands and the Falklands, Brazil and the Arctic. The bad news: We could cook the planet. That […]

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Alternative Development Projects Take Root in Colombia

Alternative Development Projects Take Root in Colombia

Colombia is enjoying a growth spurt, thanks in large part to security gains made in recent years. The amount of coca cultivated in Colombia has decreased from 357,800 acres in 2001 to 140,847 acres in 2010. An international aid effort is helping the Colombian government. Notes an article in today’s Miami Herald: The alternative development […]

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The Resource Miracle?

The Resource Miracle?

U-2’s front man is an able writer on developmental economics, this much became clear when he penned the foreword to Jeff Sachs’ “The End of Poverty” in 2005. A few days ago, Bono published a column for TIME. His premise: the world is on the cusp of another natural resource boom, and it need not […]

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Carlos Fuentes, 1928-2012

Carlos Fuentes, 1928-2012

An aspiring writer in the 1940s, Carlos Fuentes was cautioned by his diplomat father to get a real job. Instead, Carlos threaded the needle: he satisficed padre by acquiring a law degree. Then he spent two decades as a Mexican diplomat, managing to resign twice for more or less the same reason: in 1968 he […]

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Bolivia’s Quinoa Conundrum

Bolivia’s Quinoa Conundrum

Pedestaled by the Andes at 12,000 ft above sea level, Bolivia is one of the most closed off countries in the world. Since coming to office in 2005, President Evo Morales has increased the isolation by implementing a range of measures to discourage foreign investment; most recently, on May 1 he announced the nationalization of […]

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Getting Lost Trying to Quantify Corruption

Getting Lost Trying to Quantify Corruption

Last week the New York Times exposed that Wal-Mart de Mexico bribed local officials $24 million to hurry permitting for new stores. Most of the subsequent reportage has focused on stateside implications for Wal-Mart, which may include violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The company’s stock is down over 7% since the story broke. […]

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Reigniting US-Latin American Relations

Reigniting US-Latin American Relations

US policymakers have never known how to deal with Latin America. Now, in the wake of last weekend’s embarrassing Summit of the Americas, domestic politics and diplomatic inertia add up to ongoing US disengagement from the region. It doesn’t have to be this way. Rather, President Obama should make a follow up speech to his […]

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Argentina, the New Nigeria

Argentina, the New Nigeria

No, it’s not because the land of the Pampas looks to become an energy giant as it taps the world’s third-largest shale gas reserves. Rather, Argentina is becoming the victimizer of internet-gullible Westerners. PRI’s “The World” recently aired a story on foreign nationals recently arrested in Argentina for trafficking cocaine. Says The World anchor Marco […]

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Spain’s Educated Youth Bound for Chile

Spain’s Educated Youth Bound for Chile

Mileuristas are 20-something Spaniards who, beyond the current economic crisis, also face a labor market oversaturated with qualified candidates. Despite impressive CVs—many are bilingual and possess graduate degrees—mileuristas can’t earn more than 1,000 euros a month. Hence, they’re forced to live with their parents and, in general, put life plans on hold until they can […]

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Colombia’s Oil Boom

Colombia’s Oil Boom

Colombia is now Latin America’s fourth-largest oil exporter, but production seems to have hit a ceiling just shy of 1 million barrels per day. “Gushers and Guns,” a piece in this week’s Economist, delves into the security dimensions that initially cleared the way for Colombia’s oil boom, but now impede rapid advances. This may be […]

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On the Iran-Venezuela Alliance

On the Iran-Venezuela Alliance

The National Interest just published a piece I wrote on the ailing Iran-Venezuela alliance. Both countries are reeling from economic mismanagement and geopolitical isolation: Led by Undersecretary Stuart Levey, the U.S. Treasury has waged a global campaign to stop banks from laundering money for Iran’s nuclear program in recent years, and international sanctions are slowly […]

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About the Author

Sean Goforth
Sean Goforth

Sean H. Goforth is a graduate of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. His research focuses on Latin American political economy and international trade. Sean is the author of Axis of Unity: Venezuela, Iran & the Threat to America.

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