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INDECent

INDECent

What the decline of a hallowed institution says about Argentine politics, and why Chavez shares the blame. The Economist recently announced it will no longer publish inflation figures supplied by the Argentine government because of chronic underreporting of official figures—by half, according to just about every independent surveyor—and the politicization of INDEC, Argentina’s official statistics […]

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Mexico: Beyond the Border

Eyeing the headlines, Americans can be forgiven for seeing the US-Mexican border as little more than a putrid cheese cloth: immigrants keep getting through and the drug violence just barely keeps out. Going ‘beyond the border’, as the aptly named Great Decisions 2012 episode does, offers a more refined view of Mexico. Of course, Mexico […]

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Chomsky on Latin America and U.S. Decline

Chomsky on Latin America and U.S. Decline

Noam Chomsky, more prolific as an author of books than op-eds, recently published an essay on HuffPo titled “The Imperial Way.” In it, he argues: In the past decade, for the first time in 500 years, South America has taken successful steps to free itself from western domination, another serious loss [to US primacy]. The region […]

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Venezuela After Chavez

Venezuela After Chavez

What will Venezuela look like after Hugo Chávez’s reign? Given the secrecy surrounding Chávez’s cancer status and the growing popularity of Henrique Capriles, Chavez’s rival in the October 7 election, the question is more relevant now than anytime since 2003. Last week Wikistrat, a geostrategic consulting firm I am associated with, published a piece on […]

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Plotting Out North America’s Shale Boom

Plotting Out North America’s Shale Boom

Two weeks ago Wikistrat launched a simulation on North America’s energy bonanza. In case you’re wondering, Wikistrat is a firm that relies on a six-continent wide arsenal of analysts to stake out geostrategic scenarios, and the scope of its simulations are equally broad, at least at the start. For example: What if current estimates of […]

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Is Latin America Confident for All the Wrong Reasons?

Is Latin America Confident for All the Wrong Reasons?

Latin America’s technocrats spent the second half of 2011 on mushy footing, unsure what effect the euro zone crisis might have on the region and afraid that China might experience a “hard landing.” Now some of the region’s wonks are expressing more confidence. “Latin America has never been better equipped to move forward,” said Guillermo […]

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Dilma’s Dangerous Idea

Dilma’s Dangerous Idea

In an article for the Economist’s “The World in 2012,” President Dilma Rousseff argues for “the Brazilian model” to be emulated by other developing countries. The essay rightly emphasizes Brazil’s record in poverty alleviation and environmental issues. At times though, Rousseff sounds off cue. For example, she writes: We should all strive to raise wages in line […]

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Axis of Unity: Venezuela, Iran & the Threat to America

Axis of Unity: Venezuela, Iran & the Threat to America

   Now published! The introduction can be downloaded from Amazon for free.

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UNAM Goes Online

UNAM Goes Online

At 101 years old, the National Autonomous University of Mexico is one of Latin America’s premier universities, and one of its largest, with over 300,000 students enrolled. Last month, UNAM started posting its archives and teaching materials on the Internet—for free. See www.unamenlinea.unam.mx. In part, political pressure against the university is motivating the endeavor. UNAM […]

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Mexico’s Economy Excelled in 2011, Brazil’s Sputtered–Surprised?

Mexico’s Economy Excelled in 2011, Brazil’s Sputtered–Surprised?

  Latin America’s two largest economies started 2011 on different notes. Mexico’s growth was set to ring up about 4 percent, with drug violence clipping about a point off growth, according to BBVA Bancomer, and reliance on a weakening U.S. economy wielding another discount. In April, auto production, a key industry in Mexico, experienced a […]

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Mexico’s Peso: The Six-Month Yawn

Mexico’s Peso: The Six-Month Yawn

Mexico’s peso has been topsy-turvy since October 2008. The classic explanation is that developing countries with open capital markets, like Mexico, get hurt by a flight to safety in times of global uncertainty. Sure enough, after the collapse of Lehman Bros. and the onset of the global financial crisis, the peso plummeted. It was a […]

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2011 in Review

2011 in Review

Mexico has been slow to mend from the repeated stabs of a drug war, declared in 2006, and the blunt pummel of America’s recession in 2008. But 2011 showed more signs of recovery than relapse. At least 40,000 Mexicans have been killed from drug-related violence over the past five years, and the number directly affected […]

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Mexico Bolsters Free Trade with Central America

Mexico Bolsters Free Trade with Central America

On November 22 Mexico signed a free trade agreement with the Central American states of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. At the signing ceremony in San Salvador, El Salvador, Mexican foreign secretary Patricia Espinosa said: “This new agreement is very innovative because it fosters dialogue among companies, private investors and governments. I […]

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Is Mexico Decoupling?

Is Mexico Decoupling?

Conventional wisdom holds that Mexico’s economy marches in lockstep with America’s. Mexico sends most of its exports to the US, after all, and Mexico is a middle class nation thanks in large part to the country’s integration into the North American economy. But on 22 November Mexico reported growth of 4.5 percent over the same […]

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Economics Round-Up: Mexican Output Beats Forecasts, Brazil Revises GDP

Economics Round-Up: Mexican Output Beats Forecasts, Brazil Revises GDP

Mexico’s industrial output rose by 1.7 percent from August to September, the biggest leap in nearly two years. Analysts had expected a negligible 0.21 percent increase, but the hearty rebound of America’s car industry helped Mexican car factories chalk strong gains. In addition to manufacturing, the construction industry posted a healthy uptick. “Despite all the […]

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About the Author

Sean Goforth
Sean Goforth

Sean H. Goforth is a graduate of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. His research focuses on Latin American political economy and international trade. Sean is the author of Axis of Unity: Venezuela, Iran & the Threat to America.

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