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Will Mexico’s Top Banker Be the Next IMF Chief?

Will Mexico’s Top Banker Be the Next IMF Chief?

Agustin Carstens, Mexico’s central bank chief and possibly Michael Moore’s long lost brother, is the first official nominee for the post held until last week by Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Since its inception in 1945, the IMF has had a European as its head (America got dibs on the World Bank spot). Now the EU governments are […]

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Mark Your Calendar

Mark Your Calendar

“Making Markets Work for Small-Scale Farmers” will air as a live video stream on May 25. Here is the link: http://www.iied.org/sustainable-markets/key-issues/market-governance/provocation-series-making-markets-work-for-smallhol The series is sponsored by the UN Research Institute for Social Development, the International Institute for Environment and Development, Hivos and Mainumby. This will be the fourth segment of a six-part series, and it […]

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Mark Your Calendar

Mark Your Calendar

“Making Markets Work for Small-Scale Farmers” will air as a live video stream on May 25. Here is the link: http://www.iied.org/sustainable-markets/key-issues/market-governance/provocation-series-making-markets-work-for-smallhol The series is sponsored by the UN Research Institute for Social Development, the International Institute for Environment and Development, Hivos and Mainumby. This will be the fourth segment of a six-part series, and it […]

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Dying Languages in Mexico and Colombia

Dying Languages in Mexico and Colombia

The total number of Ayapeneco speakers remaining in Mexico: two.  The men live some 500 meters apart in the tropical lowlands of Tabasco state. But Manuel Segovia, 75, and Isidro Velazquez, 69, don’t like one another and refuse to talk. The Syndey Morning Herald reports that there are 68 indigenous languages in Mexico; many of […]

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Mobile Banking in Brazil

Mobile Banking in Brazil

This week’s Economist includes a special report on international banking. On page 8 of the report, tucked inside an article on Japan’s woefully conservative banking industry, is an interesting graphic. A survey conducted by Datamonitor asked internet users in a dozen countries how important mobile banking is to them. Brazil leads the pack in percentage […]

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Roundup: Calderon, Obama, Slim Shady

Roundup: Calderon, Obama, Slim Shady

Earlier this week President Calderón appeared on the Charlie Rose Show. In his usual technocratic fashion, Calderón ticked off the security challenges posed by drug violence in Mexico, then detailed the countermeasures: taking on the criminals, building better law enforcement institutions, and addressing the socioeconomic roots of crime in Mexico. Also of interest, the president […]

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March for Peace, May 8

March for Peace, May 8

Mexican poet Javier Sicilia, father of slain Juan Francisco, will headline a massive protest against the government’s drug war strategy tomorrow. The first protest took place on May 5 in the city of Cuernavaca, not far from where Juan Francisco died. Protests are scheduled in 31 sites across Mexico, and all manner of civil society […]

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Argentina Wins Labeling Dispute Against Spain

Argentina Wins Labeling Dispute Against Spain

The EU has long had a virtual monopoly over a realm of trade dispute known as “labeling,” using a name on a product label that invokes a specific region, concentration of ingredients, or production process. Time-crafted traditions that, after generations, yield global renown should be protected from any Johnny-come-lately ripping off the name. That’s the […]

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Argentine Orchestra in Gaza

Argentine Orchestra in Gaza

Led by maestro Daniel Barenhoim, an Argentine symphony played to a crowd of 400 in the Hamas-controlled Palestinian territory of Gaza yesterday, marking the first time Gaza has hosted an orchestra. The immediate impact was stunning.  “I felt I was dreaming. This concert took me out of the difficult conditions we are facing here. I […]

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Fuel Subsidies

With a barrel of oil going for $120 on world markets, emerging economies are suffering from the growing strain of fuel subsidies. The IMF estimates that fuel subsidies reached $250 billion in 2010, up from $60 billion in 2003. Compared to Asia, Latin America is fairing rather well. Mexico and Venezuela certainly have high fuel subsidies.  Venezuela spends […]

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Judicial Reform Likely in Ecuador

Judicial Reform Likely in Ecuador

Cedatos, a polling firm in Ecuador, expects President Rafael Correa to handily win a May 7 referendum to overhaul the country’s judicial system. Chief among the ten ballot proposals is the establishment of a temporary panel—to be replaced by a five-member council with a six-year mandate—that will appoint top judges. Other measures on the ballot […]

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68 Rescued in Tamaulipas

Of the 68 people rescued in the northern state of Tamaulipas on Wednesday, 12 are migrants from Central America. According to their accounts, gunmen identifying themselves with the Gulf Cartel seized the group off an autobus. Tamaulipas has been in the news because of the grizzly mass murder of 72 migrants in San Fernando last […]

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Mass Murder in San Fernando

Mass Murder in San Fernando

San Fernando is quick becoming the murder center of Mexico. In recent days the bodies of 145 people have been uncovered, most in mass graves, about an hour-and-a-half drive south of Brownsville, Texas. Mexican federal investigators expect more bodies to be discovered there soon. In connection, 16 local police officers were arrested for collusion with […]

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The Zetas, Sinaloa Tap New Sources of Revenue

The Zetas, Sinaloa Tap New Sources of Revenue

As pointed out by an article in World Politics Review, Mexico’s major drug gangs are being squeezed between the “war on drugs” and the global economy, forcing them to turn over a new leaf.  So it seems they are looking to generate revenue by stealing legal commodities. Oil tapping is perhaps the most prominent tactic […]

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The Future of Science in Brazil

The Future of Science in Brazil

When it comes to scientific production in the new millennium, Brazil has gone from a minnow to a marlin. Science and technology investment tripled, from $10.6 billion in 2002 to $30 billion in 2009. The number of active researchers has burgeoned, as has the number of labs and refereed papers published. Brazil’s inroads into cutting […]

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About the Author

Sean Goforth
Sean Goforth

Sean H. Goforth is a graduate of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. His research focuses on Latin American political economy and international trade. Sean is the author of Axis of Unity: Venezuela, Iran & the Threat to America.

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