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Get Your Dukes Up

Get Your Dukes Up

There’s never a dull moment in Bangkok. As I recently reported, rumblings of a coup are gaining traction. The atmosphere in the city is becoming eerily similar to when Yellow Shirt demonstrations took hold in 2008. Protests, albeit of a small variety, are beginning to sporadically pop up. The main difference today is that the […]

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Thailand: Would You Care for a Coup Today?

Thailand: Would You Care for a Coup Today?

I recently asked a journalist friend of mine with over 25 years of experience reporting across Southeast Asia, “Do you think it’s possible we’ll see a coup in Thailand soon?” His sardonic reply was, “A coup in Thailand? Well it’s not like that’s ever happened before.” In its current state, Thai politics is at best […]

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On Chut Wutty and Journalist Protection in Cambodia

On Chut Wutty and Journalist Protection in Cambodia

I’m sure most of us are familiar with this famous quote from Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels: “If you repeat a lie often enough, it becomes the truth.” Personally, I prefer the much more humorous George Costanza line in a Seinfeld episode when Jerry is trying to defeat a polygraph test being given to him […]

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Logging, Corruption, and Murder

Logging, Corruption, and Murder

The director of a well-known Cambodian environmental organization seeking to highlight governmental negligence and corruption regarding the issue of illegal logging was brutally gunned down by military police this past Wednesday night. Chut Wutty, director of the Natural Resource Protection Group (and a personal friend of this author), was shot and killed in a car […]

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Southern Thailand: Another Failure for Yingluck

Southern Thailand: Another Failure for Yingluck

In the latest twist in the increasingly violent saga of Thailand’s southern problem, last month’s triple bomb blast in the province of Yala highlighted another failure of the administration of Yingluck Shinawatra’s eight-month old government: the campaign vow to grant the three southern provinces of Yala, Pattani, and Narathiwat ‘special administration zone’ status. Much like […]

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China and Cambodia: A Love Story

China and Cambodia: A Love Story

Safe inside his armored motorcade and surrounded by nearly two dozen police motorcycle escorts, Chinese Premier Hu Jintao traversed north along Sothearos Boulevard in Phnom Penh this past Saturday morning, passing a 20 foot portrait of his face as well as one of his wife’s as his entourage made its way towards the Peace Palace […]

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Take a Seat, Madame

Take a Seat, Madame

After campaigning tirelessly throughout the majority of her adult life in hopes of bringing democracy to her country and after spending nearly fifteen of those years under house arrest for espousing her views, Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s icon of hope and political freedom, has unofficially won a seat in the country’s parliament. An official […]

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2012 ASEAN Summit — Phnom Penh, Cambodia

2012 ASEAN Summit — Phnom Penh, Cambodia

The 2012 Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit will take place April 3rd and 4th in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. As the new chair of the regional bloc for the 2012 year, Cambodia will have an opportunity to show off its capital city’s latest developments, both socioeconomic and political. The streets are already being decked […]

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Teach a Kid to Cook, Feed Him for Life

Teach a Kid to Cook, Feed Him for Life

“Let me tell you, it hurts. It hurts bad,” remarks Johnny Phillips, elucidating the emotional and sometimes physical pain extracting yet another $1000 from an ATM in Phnom Penh can cause. Mr. Phillips is the founder of BuckHunger, a nonprofit organization which seeks to provide free food to Cambodian children whilst also teaching the kids […]

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An Apolitical Way to Be

An Apolitical Way to Be

“Bpuu! Bpuu! Kgnom soam dtaow tribunals,” I say to the all-too-eager tuk tuk driver, individuals who are typically all-too-happy to drive foreigners anywhere. My Khmer language skills after one month are OK, but it is still a work in progress. Still, I stand there boasting to the other drivers and motodops hovering around, impressed with […]

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Bangkok Becoming a Battleground for Israel-Iran Feud

Bangkok Becoming a Battleground for Israel-Iran Feud

The long standing feud between Israel and Iran was augmented to new levels this week after explosions occurred in New Delhi, India and Tbilisi, Georgia, while another bomb plot was foiled in Bangkok, Thailand. Three men have been arrested in the Thai capital and the country’s top police official, Gen. Prewpan Dhamapong, has said that […]

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In a Brothel in Cambodia

In a Brothel in Cambodia

I arrived in Phnom Penh late last Saturday. This is the second time I’ve come to Cambodia and the country, more specifically its capital city, is just as seedy as I recall from last time I was here in 2008. There is no delicate way of tip toeing around the issue of sex workers and […]

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I’m Coming Home, I’m Coming Home, Tell the World I’m Coming Home

I’m Coming Home, I’m Coming Home, Tell the World I’m Coming Home

The return of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra to Thailand appears to be a formality at this point; a question of when, not if. It was inevitable as soon as the polls closed in Thailand’s last election this past July which saw Thaksin’s reincarnated Pheu Thai party, headed by his sister Yingluck, emerge victorious on […]

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Great Decisions 2012: Inside Indonesia — A Review

Great Decisions 2012: Inside Indonesia — A Review

It is the world’s largest Muslim country but remains for the most part secular. It is home to the eighteenth largest economy on the globe but more than sixteen percent of the population lives on less than $2 per day. Indonesia has long been considered the linchpin for Southeast Asia and, indeed, serves as a […]

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Cambodia’s Poor, Betrayed

Cambodia’s Poor, Betrayed

This article originally appeared at Dissent Magazine. Approximately 70 people sat outside the U.S. Embassy in Phnom Penh last week in the sweltering heat because, quite frankly, they had nowhere else to go. They were members of some 300 families who were forcibly evicted from their homes in Phnom Penh’s Borei Keila district on January […]

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About the Author

Tim LaRocco
Tim LaRocco

Tim LaRocco is an adjunct professor of political science at St. Joseph's College in New York. He was previously a Southeast Asia based journalist and his articles have appeared in a variety of political affairs publications. He is also the author of "Hegemony 101: Great Power Behavior in the Regional Domain" (Lambert, 2013). Tim splits his time between Long Island, New York and Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Twitter: @TheRealMrTim.

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