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Not Guilty

Not Guilty

A Malaysian judge has ruled today that fiery opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim is not guilty of sodomy charges brought forth by a former male aide. The verdict opens up the possibility for Ibrahim to stand in the next general election and challenge the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) party which has held political power in the […]

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No Justice for Hmong Refugees

No Justice for Hmong Refugees

In the early 1960s, policymakers in Washington expressed fear that the Vietnam War would spill over into neighboring countries. In Laos, a country that had been declared neutral, the CIA’s Special Activities Division was tasked with subverting the rise of communist elements like Pathet Lao which were backed by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA). This […]

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Thailand’s Lèse Majesté Law

Thailand’s Lèse Majesté Law

Long live His Majesty King Bhumibol! I felt that this post is going to need such a qualifier. I previously lived in Thailand in 2008 as a volunteer worker with an NGO. I love Thailand: the people, the culture, the food. I hope to return there one day, and it would not do me any […]

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China’s Soft Power in Southeast Asia

China’s Soft Power in Southeast Asia

There are two types of power evident in the study of international relations: hard power and soft power. The former is coercive, and is associated with a state’s use of military force or economic pressure in order to maximize its interests. Hard power is advocated by those who believe that relative gains are the most […]

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A Special 50th Anniversary in West Papua

A Special 50th Anniversary in West Papua

On December 1st, 1961, the Dutch flag, which had flown over the peninsula of West Papua for more than 130 years, was taken down, replaced by the “Morning Star” flag, which signified the new nation’s break from colonialism. By the end of the decade, Indonesia had forcefully annexed West Papua (also known as West Irian […]

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Southeast Asia 2011: A Year in Review

Southeast Asia 2011: A Year in Review

“One Vision, One Identity, One Community” is the motto of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Was that the case in 2011? The region was predictably under-covered by the US mainstream media. I tried my best to bring unique, insightful coverage of the region as best I could from afar, highlighting a different country […]

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The Burma Spring

The Burma Spring

As pro-democracy movements swept across the globe over the past year and the list of dictators and autocratic governments toppling, or trying desperately to avoid doing so, continued to grow, a common postulation I heard was whether or not there would be a regime that would appear ahead of the curve of their own protests? […]

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Photos of a Cambodian Trash Dump

Photos of a Cambodian Trash Dump

I am almost embarrassed to admit this but after having lived in various countries in the Third World, having seen some pretty awful slum towns outside of Johannesburg, having walked through the “dwellings” of the hill tribes of Issan, having crossed the Thai/Burma border at Mae Sai and seeing the endless rows of begging children […]

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Four Decades On, Kissinger Still Feels the Heat

Four Decades On, Kissinger Still Feels the Heat

As the Occupy Wall Street protests continue to rage in downtown New York for its sixth straight week, word has recently come out that some civil society groups in the area are planning to turn their attention to the Waldorf Astoria hotel in midtown next week. That is because on November 7th, the New York […]

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Yingluck’s Katrina

Yingluck’s Katrina

There was never a better case study of how not to conduct public policy during an environmental disaster than the way President George W. Bush and his supporting group of miscast advisors handled Hurricane Katrina in 2005. However, after coming to grips with the situation in Thailand and how the administration of newly elected Prime […]

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Old Enemies, New Friends

Old Enemies, New Friends

It was a strange sight at the National War College in Washington D.C. last week: A Vietnamese military officer giving a speech about his country’s national defense. Lieutenant-General Vo Tien Trung, the first member of the Vietnamese military to speak in the United States since the end of the war between the two countries in […]

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Floods Cripple Southeast Asia

Floods Cripple Southeast Asia

Over 150 people have been killed throughout parts of Southeast Asia over the past two months as the region has been inundated by the worst flooding to hit the area in years. From Northern Thailand and neighboring Cambodia, all the way to Vietnam, the Mekong River Delta has turned poor, rural communities and even major […]

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Yingluck’s Foreign Policy

Yingluck’s Foreign Policy

When Yingluck Shinawatra was elected Prime Minister of Thailand this past July, I remarked how this development was likely to ameliorate the tensions which had developed over the years between her country and its neighbor to the east, Cambodia. Between allegations of espionage leveled by Phnom Penh against the government of former Thai Premier Abhisit […]

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More on Malaysia/Lynas Controversy

More on Malaysia/Lynas Controversy

Earlier this month, I wrote about a growing confrontation in Kuantan, Malaysia regarding a planned rare earth mining facility to be opened by an Australian corporation. The plant – which would become the world’s largest of its kind and the first rare earth refining operation built outside of China in many years – had been […]

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Australian Corporate Skullduggery in Malaysia?

Australian Corporate Skullduggery in Malaysia?

September was supposed to be the month in which operations began at a rare earth processing facility located in Kuantan, Malaysia, a fast-growing port city situated along the South China Sea. The project, awarded to the Australian-based Lynas Corporation, was originally envisaged as a lofty effort at breaking the Chinese monopoly of the production of […]

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About the Author

Tim LaRocco
Tim LaRocco

Tim LaRocco is an adjunct professor of political science at St. Joseph's College in New York. He was previously a Southeast Asia based journalist and his articles have appeared in a variety of political affairs publications. He is also the author of "Hegemony 101: Great Power Behavior in the Regional Domain" (Lambert, 2013). Tim splits his time between Long Island, New York and Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Twitter: @TheRealMrTim.

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