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SE Asia: Weekly Roundup

This isn’t going to be one of my typical analytical postings, but there was some interesting news as well as a few fascinating/disturbing videos that were brought to my attention this week that I felt I simply had to share. Firstly, there was a chilling scene outside a Phnom Penh money exchange yesterday that resulted […]

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Cambodia: NGOs vs. Government

Cambodia: NGOs vs. Government

Civil society in Cambodia is typically a very contentious issue. A few months ago, I attempted to dichotomize the diverging opinions on this subject by highlighting the urgent need for NGOs in the developing world whilst pointing out that many of these institutions are fatalities of their own benevolence. The problem, of course, is rooted […]

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Amigo: An Independent Film Review

Last night I attended the New York premier of Amigo (trailer above), the independent film and brainchild of John Sayles about the Philippine-American War. The film supplements Sayles’ novel A Moment in the Sun (McSweeney’s Books, 2011), which details a small chapter in American history but also one of utmost significance as a comparison to […]

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Judging Success in the “War on Terror”

Judging Success in the “War on Terror”

This past week, Umar Patek, the Jemaah Islamiyah militant responsible for assembling the explosives used in the 2002 bombings in Bali, was extradited to Indonesia after being captured in Pakistan in late March. Patek is also believed to have been behind the attacks on Christian churches in cities across Indonesia on Christmas Eve, 2000. His […]

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China: The Benevolent Hegemon in S.E. Asia?

China: The Benevolent Hegemon in S.E. Asia?

There is a common misconception that China is an actual member state of ASEAN. Indeed, China is not one of the ten member states that make up the organization. An interesting fact about this regional institution is that during its earlier years, two of the member states – Indonesia and Vietnam – had their own […]

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Change is Afoot in Thailand

Change is Afoot in Thailand

In a recent piece I authored at Dissent Magazine, I remarked about the ever-expanding income discrepancy between the rich and poor that has come to characterize Thailand as the region’s most evident and relevant example of class warfare. Not only were the results of the recent elections last month a manifestation of a nation-state’s proletariat […]

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Thailand’s Muslim Insurgency: Now What?

Thailand’s Muslim Insurgency: Now What?

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the interesting developments in Thailand’s “deep south,” the site of a long standing Muslim insurgency seeking independence from the government in Bangkok. Soon to be Prime Miniser Yingluck Shinawatra had been stumping in the region in mid-June in an attempt to capture some crucial electoral votes for the […]

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A Foreshadowing of Thailand’s Political Heterodox?

A Foreshadowing of Thailand’s Political Heterodox?

As news broke yesterday that a Cambodian solider was killed on the border with Thailand, the site of a border dispute that was just recently adjudicated by the International Court of Justice (ICJ), a brief but critical analysis is required in order to ascertain the significance of such a development. The Phnom Penh Post reported […]

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FPA Audio Voiceover: Thai Elections

In case you missed it posted elsewhere, here is my brief, audio synopsis on the Thai elections. This is part of the “Expert Minute,” a new feature at the Foreign Policy Association in which bloggers such as myself have an opportunity to orally explain a relevant event in our region or area of focus over […]

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ICJ Ruling on Thai-Cambodian Dispute

ICJ Ruling on Thai-Cambodian Dispute

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled today that both Thailand and Cambodia should pull their troops out from the site of an ancient Hindu temple and establish a demilitarized zone around its ruins in order to facilitate negotiations to finally end the long-standing spat between the two countries. The 11-5 ruling from the judges […]

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Thailand-Cambodia: Relations Reset

Thailand-Cambodia: Relations Reset

The extent of change in a country’s foreign policy during the transition to a new regime can sometimes be striking. It is a proposition which will be played out in Thailand over the coming weeks and months as the new Pheu Thai-led coalition begins to govern following its electoral victory last week. The result of […]

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Comeback Complete

Comeback Complete

Amidst a backdrop of popular discontent and social strife, Yingluck Shinawatra, sister to ex-Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, was swept into office Sunday on a tidal wave of support from the poor, rural Thai majority. Ms. Yingluck will become Thailand’s first female prime minister in August when she will be all but certainly be given the […]

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Beware the Westerner with a Smiling Face

Beware the Westerner with a Smiling Face

I once read that there are but three types of western expats to be found in Cambodia: drunken/stoned womanizers, fugitives, and do-gooders. After much independent research and a brief stopover during a border run from Thailand, I have no reason to question the veracity of this assertion. That said, I will leave the former two […]

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Renewed Hostilities in the South China Sea

Renewed Hostilities in the South China Sea

It is a dangerous time to be a fishing trawler in the South China Sea these days. Earlier this month, a Vietnamese vessel searching for oil had a rather unpleasant confrontation with a Chinese fishing boat, resulting in damage to the Vietnamese’s seismic equipment used for exploration purposes. Moreover, just this past week, the administration […]

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Stumping in Thailand's Muslim South

Stumping in Thailand's Muslim South

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas for Pheu Thai leaders. As the campaigns for both major parties ratchet up in anticipation of the July 3rd vote, Yingluck Shinawatra, Pheu Thai’s very likely candidate for the premiership and sister to ousted ex-Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, received a huge boost after stumping in Yala province […]

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About the Author

Tim LaRocco
Tim LaRocco

Tim LaRocco is an adjunct professor of political science at St. Joseph's College in New York. He was previously a Southeast Asia based journalist and his articles have appeared in a variety of political affairs publications. He is also the author of "Hegemony 101: Great Power Behavior in the Regional Domain" (Lambert, 2013). Tim splits his time between Long Island, New York and Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Twitter: @TheRealMrTim.

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