Foreign Policy Blogs

Arms Control and Proliferation

North Korea Conundrum

We’ve been waiting since mid-June to find out what consequences will follow from North Korea’s presumed sinking of a South Korean warship, since the Obama administration has repeatedly said that such a wanton act cannot be allowed to stand without consequences. As yet the UN Security Council has not adopted tougher sanctions to punish the […]

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Iran Sanctions: What's Ahead?

An excellent issue brief from the Arms Control Association points out that a ban on major weapon deliveries, hardly mentioned if at all in most press coverage, is one of the most significant provisions of the sanctions the UN Security Council imposed on Iran last week. Resolution 1929 directs all states to “prevent the direct […]

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More on Israel-South Africa Nuclear Cooperation

On June 7, the Carnegie Endowment in Washington, D.C., sponsored a discussion of the Polakow-Suransky book in which Shimon Peres is said to have offered apartheid South Africa nuclear weapons–the subject of an earlier blog. The discussion involved several experts on Israel and international affairs, notably Avner Cohen, author of The Worst Kept Secret: Israel’s […]

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What's History and What's Not

It hasn’t been a good season for Israel. Even before its ill-advised raid on the Gaza convoy, which could have and might yet cause the Security Council’s agreement on Iran sanctions to come unglued, there was a string of more or less unsavory allegations about the history of its nuclear weapons program. First came the […]

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Israel Raid and Iran Sanctions

If Israel had wanted to torpedo the fourth round of UN nuclear sanctions against Iran, accelerate Iran’s weaponization efforts, and hasten the day when Tel Aviv will face a second nuclear-armed hostile Islamic state, it could have done no better than attack the Gaza convoy and kill anti-blockade activists. The UN Security Council was scheduled […]

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China Delivers on Iran Sanctions

China owed the world one on Iran, for reasons explored in a previous post, and today it delivered, joining the United States, Russia, France and the UK in agreeing to draft sanctions. If adopted by the full UN Security Council, the sanctions will authorize members to board ships entering or leaving Iran, to search for […]

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Next Needed Nonproliferation Step

As the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty review conference draws to a close in New York, what’s remarkable is how little attention the meeting has got in the world press. Except for fleeting attention to the idea of making the Middle East a nuclear-weapons-free-zone, which Egypt has been promoting as leader of the “group of 77” nonaligned […]

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Iran's Nuclear Intentions

My fellow FPA blogger Rob Grace asks why I think Iran is determined to develop nuclear weaponry, and whether it might not just be shooting for breakout capacity—the ability to build an atomic bomb quickly, perhaps upon giving sudden notice of NPT termination. Good questions. In November 2003, the IAEA reported that over two decades […]

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NPT Review: What Israel Owes to Itself

Previous posts this week have drawn attention to the big issue hanging over the Nuclear Nonproliferation review conference this week in New York–whether China will support stronger sanctions against Iran—and to China’s indebtedness to all those who have nonproliferation at heart. But why is it important to slow Iran’s nuclear program? Can sanctions actually work? […]

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Iran, China and Pakistan

My post earlier this week drew attention to the nuclear weapons assistance that Iran almost certainly obtained from China via Pakistan, and the astonishing possibility that China actually tested Pakistan’s first atomic bomb for it at Lop Nur in May 1990. First, on the general question of Chinese nuclear weapons assistance to Pakistan, there’s not […]

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Nonproliferation Review and Iran: Why China Owes Us One

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, Article 1: “Each nuclear-weapon State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to transfer to any recipient whatsoever nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or control over such weapons or explosive devices directly, or indirectly; and not in any way to assist, encourage, or induce any non-nuclear-weapon State to manufacture or otherwise […]

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Nuclear-Security, Off-Camera

As leaders of 47 countries gather in Washington to discuss how to better secure nuclear materials, not a few observers are noting that what’s not happening may be more interesting and significant than what’s happening–and that’s not to belittle the importance of what’s under formal discussion, by the way. Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu cancelled plans to […]

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New Start

I personally would characterize the treaty, like last December’s Copenhagen (climate) Accord, as the bare minimum acceptable.

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New Blog Coming Soon

Welcome to the Arms Control and proliferation blog, the latest addition to the Foreign Policy Blogs network.

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