Foreign Policy Blogs

Democracy Promotion

Continued Transitions for Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia

Continued Transitions for Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia

The international relations history buffs among you probably know the story of former Chinese premier Zhou Enlai’s quip about the French Revolution: when someone asked him about the revolution on one of President Nixon’s trips to China in the early 1970s, he said that it was “too soon to say.” Last year, a former foreign […]

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Further Thoughts on Democracy in Cambodia

Further Thoughts on Democracy in Cambodia

  By Scott Bleiweis and Tim LaRocco Recently Scott connected with fellow FPA blogger and journalist Tim LaRocco. Tim lives in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and shares his perspective on some issues raised in Scott’s recent post about chances for democracy in Cambodia. Tim writes, “Having been a resident of Phnom Penh for awhile now, I have had […]

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The World Votes for U.S. President Part II

The World Votes for U.S. President Part II

If you are also a fan of global opinion polling, Wednesday was an exciting day. A few weeks ago, I wrote about Gallup’s findings on world opinion of U.S. leadership. Yesterday, the Pew Global Attitudes project released new data that, with greater specificity, measures world opinion of Barack Obama, American culture and U.S. foreign policy, […]

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Will the Arab Spring Spread to Cambodia?

Will the Arab Spring Spread to Cambodia?

While the North African revolutions of the past year and a half swept away several long-serving dictators, sadly rulers with an ironclad hold on power remain in various parts of the world.  In Cambodia, Prime Minister Hun Sen has ruled the country since 1985 and shows no signs of relinquishing power. He is the longest-serving […]

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Power of 1

Power of 1

Recently I’ve focused on democracy issues on a pretty grand scale: the nation of Egypt’s first open presidential elections, Greece’s struggle to form a government and how it might impact the global economy. Yet one of the remarkable things about democracy is that you don’t need large numbers to make a difference. Sometimes all it […]

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Egyptians Wonder “Where is the Revolution?”

Egyptians Wonder “Where is the Revolution?”

One of the biggest international news stories of May, which will continue into June, directly concerns democracy. Last week the Egyptian people voted to elect a president for the first time. This landmark event has been anticipated since last year’s Arab Spring, when hundreds of thousands demanded change in leadership and how the government operated. […]

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Three Thoughts on Chen Guangcheng’s Activist Future

Three Thoughts on Chen Guangcheng’s Activist Future

At the beginning of May, I analyzed the unfolding Chen Guangcheng diplomatic controversy with the valuable input of guest contributor and Atlantic fellow Helen Gao. Today, I look ahead to what Mr. Chen’s future may hold. A little over a month ago, dissident Chen Guangcheng was living under house arrest in a farming village in […]

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A Perspective on Syria: Seven Pictures About A Week in Homs

A Perspective on Syria: Seven Pictures About A Week in Homs

Bashar-al Assad’s all too deadly caricature as an ass.  The Syrian Army lying in wait. Night-vision shots of night-time attacks. A bombed out car. An anti-Qaeda revolutionary insurgent who insists that al Qaeda’s presence in Syria, the popular narrative nowadays, is more tall-tale than truth; that the attacks roiling the country have been mainly perpetrated […]

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What If the Rest of the World Voted for the U.S. President?

What If the Rest of the World Voted for the U.S. President?

In my past two blog posts, I discussed new polling on Americans’ foreign policy views and the U.S. domestic reaction to the Chen Guangcheng case. This week, I highlight Gallup findings on how the rest of the world evaluates U.S. leadership. I look forward to hearing your thoughts!  In the race to November, professional political […]

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Testing democracy’s resolve: a look at Greece and Mexico

Testing democracy’s resolve: a look at Greece and Mexico

No one ever said democracy is easy (well, if anyone did, they shouldn’t have). It offers the promise of freedom and the ability of people to choose who governs them. But constant vigilance is required to ensure democracy holds on, and prevents government from transforming into something more sinister. Democracy exists today in many parts […]

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Two Views on the Chen Guangcheng Controversy

Two Views on the Chen Guangcheng Controversy

This week, I discuss the U.S. domestic reaction to the Chen Guangcheng case. In this post, I also have the pleasure of featuring guest analysis by Atlantic fellow Helen Gao, an emerging voice on U.S.-China relations (see Gao’s story archive here). Last week, I wrote about new polling on Americans’ foreign policy views; next week, […]

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Democracy party in Myanmar joins parliament; now what?

Democracy party in Myanmar joins parliament; now what?

In my first article I wrote about the historic election in Myanmar in which the National League for Democracy (NLD), led by former political prisoner Aung San Suu Kyi, gained seats in parliament for the first time ever. Last week NLD’s elected members took their oaths of office to officially begin serving in parliament (though […]

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Election 2012 Update: New Data on Voters’ Foreign Policy Priorities

Election 2012 Update: New Data on Voters’ Foreign Policy Priorities

As election season approaches, American voters’ beliefs about foreign policy issues are increasingly clear. According to a recent Pew “Public Priorities” survey, voters’ concerns about the economy trump all other concerns, with 86 percent of Americans classifying the economy as “a ‘top priority’ for the president and Congress this year” as opposed to 68 percent […]

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Russia’s opposition looks to bring protesting back to its roots

Russia’s opposition looks to bring protesting back to its roots

  It’s an interesting time to be in Russia. As democracy goes, the country seems to be going backwards and forwards at the same time. The holding of free and fair elections is widely considered one of the hallmarks of a stable democracy. Here Russia seems to be struggling. In March Vladimir Putin won a […]

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Chester A. Arthur, Communism, and Egypt’s Constitutional Court

Chester A. Arthur, Communism, and Egypt’s Constitutional Court

Just as the blogosphere was starting to become familiar with the likely frontrunners in Egypt’s upcoming presidential race, the election commission disqualified three of the most most visible candidates, upholding this decision on Tuesday. The commission deemed candidates ineligible for various reasons: Salafist preacher Hazem Abu Ismail’s mother was an American citizen, Muslim Brotherhood financier Khairat al-Shater […]

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