Foreign Policy Blogs

Topics

NYC’s Push for “Otto Warmbier Way”: Calls for International Solidarity against the Kim Regime’s Brutal Tyranny

NYC’s Push for “Otto Warmbier Way”: Calls for International Solidarity against the Kim Regime’s Brutal Tyranny

One day, the Kim regime’s diplomatic envoys around the world might be haunted by Otto Warmbier’s name, which will be written on every incoming mail. The heightened bipartisan consensus among NYC councilmen to rename after Otto Warmbier – an American college student who passed away in 2017 from injuries sustained while imprisoned in North Korea […]

read more

Acting As We Say And Saying As We Are

Acting As We Say And Saying As We Are

There are two aspects of the theory of just war, jus ad bellum, or the justice of any given war, and jus in bello, referring to just conduct in the waging of war.  There may be an overlooked analogy for American diplomacy. In the late 1990s I heard a Brazilian ambassador address an American lunch […]

read more

Planes, Missiles and Justice

Planes, Missiles and Justice

With the recent and severe condemnation of Belarus’ actions against an opposition activist and a civil airliner, with must acknowledge that the same level of continuing condemnation should continue to address the murder of the passengers and crew of Ukrainian Airlines Flight PS752 over a year ago. Recently, the crime that was the murder of […]

read more

The Great National Divorce and its Consequences

The Great National Divorce and its Consequences

  After being a resident living in the UK and EU, learning the legal foundations and delicate intricacies of British and European Commercial Law and Intellectual Property rights, it still amazes me how these two powerful entities could still place the weakest and most needy in society at peril over the political aspirations of a […]

read more

U.S. Foreign Policy Discourse Vs. The Sources of American Conduct

U.S. Foreign Policy Discourse Vs. The Sources of American Conduct

To many Americans, foreign policy discourse comes in broad themes punctuated by very specific issues.  China policy may well form the largest of those themes, and reasonably so.  China could pose a threat to displace America’s international system, arguably the only one.  News and commentary focus heavily on China’s actions and their rulers’ intent: whether […]

read more

Plus Jamais ça and Zero Tolerance

Plus Jamais ça and Zero Tolerance

  Healthy democracies do no burn legal documents. This recent and disturbing trend when confronted with an issue that took place during Covid policy approaches should be considered as an attempt to hide serious crimes from the public at a time when the public is at its weakest. When such options are available to a […]

read more

America’s Need for Clean and Resilient Energy Infrastructure can make its Global Climate Leadership Smart Again

America’s Need for Clean and Resilient Energy Infrastructure can make its Global Climate Leadership Smart Again

With a new president-elect in the White House, it is now time for America to move forward with bipartisan efforts to resuscitate its global leadership. However, this return to normalcy depends on the liberal epicenter’s techno-industrial quest for energy infrastructure modernization and innovation (especially in adaptive energy management systems). Confronted with the inevitable 21st-century thrust […]

read more

The Proposals for Renewing the State Department

The Proposals for Renewing the State Department

Not long before President-elect Biden started naming his cabinet, two sets of recommendations to reform the Department of State were published, one from the Council on Foreign Relations, one from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School.  The Economist noted their rich menu of proposals.  Secretary of State – designate Blinken will do well to implement a […]

read more

Recommendations from Dr. Zhivago

Recommendations from Dr. Zhivago

One of the most famous censored pieces of literature in the post Second World War era is Dr. Zhivago, a work by author Boris Pasternak about the life of a family during the Russian Revolution in the early part of the 1900s. Smuggled out of the USSR and taken to Italy for publishing, the story […]

read more

Preparing for Mayhem

Preparing for Mayhem

Once the Kremlin is persuaded that Joe Biden will become the US’s next president, it may go for the jugular. Already today, not election manipulation, but triggering civil conflicts in the United States could be the main aim of Moscow’s mingling in American domestic affairs.

read more

Trump in Review: Serious Questions Remain Unanswered

Trump in Review: Serious Questions Remain Unanswered

In 2016, the United States faced a wide range of serious foreign policy questions. The United States had not readjusted key frameworks for ten or twenty years or more. Candidate Trump used populist rhetoric, pledging to “build a wall” to restrict immigration and to “drain the swamp” of Washington’s elite, globalist ecosystem. Claiming to be […]

read more

Keeping The Peace And Protecting Taiwan: Squaring A Circle?

Keeping The Peace And Protecting Taiwan: Squaring A Circle?

    The unusual news that Taiwan’s legislature passed a bipartisan bill asking the foreign ministry to seek formal relations with the US puts a clear point on the latest round of China-Taiwan tensions.  It also puts a distinct strain on the old US approach of “strategic ambiguity” around Taiwan.  Regardless of the outcome of […]

read more

Choosing Deficits Wisely

Choosing Deficits Wisely

Most countries in the world right now are trying to find a balance between having their citizens trust their Covid responses, manage the inevitable debt and deficits that arose and continue to rise with mass shutdowns of the economy, and responsibly manage that debt and deficit level so that when a time for a recovery […]

read more

Old Disputes and New Weapons

Old Disputes and New Weapons

Whether it be the conflict in Syria, skirmishes in Crimea, Ukraine and Chechnya or the recent outbreak of conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia, the old disputes that were never fully resolved have often broken out into armed conflict since the end of the Soviet Union. While the Soviet regime often created some detente between conflicting […]

read more

Personal Battles Against Corruption

Personal Battles Against Corruption

Corruption sours healthy economies, always places freedoms at risk and awards the worst of the worst for doing the most damage they can possibly imagine. Much of the slide from corruption into a full totalitarian regime comes from purging those who may limit the powers of elites who wish to dominate their fiefdom. In many […]

read more