Foreign Policy Blogs

U.S. Diplomacy

Drones on the Cocos Islands: A Cat Amongst the Pigeons

Drones on the Cocos Islands: A Cat Amongst the Pigeons

According to a report by the Washington Post just over 2 weeks ago, US officials have engaged Australia in informal discussions over a proposed US drone base in the Cocos Islands 2,000 kilometers north-west of Perth. Allegedly, the proposed base would house a fleet of Global Hawk drones. At a unit cost of $218 million […]

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Stalemate in Bahrain

Stalemate in Bahrain

The Government of Bahrain and opposition movement are at a stalemate. Last November, the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI), comprising of individuals selected for their human rights expertise released a damning report outlining the many abuses committed by Bahrain’s government during the February 2011 crisis. While the government has made progress in implementing the […]

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Red Tape vs. Red Scare: The Bureaucratic Aversion to War and Iran

Red Tape vs. Red Scare: The Bureaucratic Aversion to War and Iran

In last evening’s Republican Debate, the issue of Iran’s attempt to develop fissile material for a nuclear weapon was brought up as it has been in most of the previous debates. To be certain, this is neither a Republican nor Democratic issue, but one of national security. One candidate posited that instead of typical American […]

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A Belated New Year’s Resolution for U.S. Diplomacy

A Belated New Year’s Resolution for U.S. Diplomacy

“He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient…” Last week President Obama fulfilled his constitutional obligation and gave what some have come to refer to as our annual “national pep talk.”  When […]

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“The Two-State Solution Just Died, Mr. President”

“The Two-State Solution Just Died, Mr. President”

UNITED NATIONS – On the final day of a three month deadline set by the Quartet – Brussels, Washington, Moscow and the UN – for Israelis and Palestinians to resume bilateral peace talks, Israeli attorney Daniel Seidemann convened an exclusive briefing with the UN Correspondents Association to unveil a grim message he will deliver to […]

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US Counterterrorism Law May “Backfire”: UN

US Counterterrorism Law May “Backfire”: UN

On New Year’s Eve, President Barack Obama signed into law the post-9/11 practice of detaining terrorist suspects indefinitely without charge. Shock and awe waves rippled through the blogosphere in response to the move, not least because Obama had threatened to veto an earlier version of the bill. Other grumbles included its lack of temporal or […]

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‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

The stockings were hung, the FPA bloggers had written their last posts with care and just settled down for a long winters nap (by DC standards). When out on the 38th parallel there arose such a clatter and what to our wondering eyes appear? North Korea’s little old driver, who was so lively and quick, […]

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Political Parties in South Sudan Necessary for Democratic Growth

Political Parties in South Sudan Necessary for Democratic Growth

Months after South Sudan emerged as the world’s newest country, celebrations have died down and the government in Juba must address the numerous challenges that face the fledgling nation. Apart from addressing unresolved issues with the north and the many domestic challenges, the key to South Sudan’s progress will be maintaining good governance. Much of […]

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The Rise of “Human” Security

The Rise of “Human” Security

  “Human Security Is The Primary Purpose Of Organizing A State In The Beginning.” — Surin Pitsuwan, ASEAN In the wake of the Arab Spring, and in light of the ongoing global economic disorder, world leaders would be well advised to examine their understanding of national security. Recent events paint a picture of national leaders […]

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You Can Tell a Lot About a Government by How It Treats Women…Sometimes

You Can Tell a Lot About a Government by How It Treats Women…Sometimes

If a country’s government is democratic and classically liberal, men and women are generally treated as equals. However, if men and women are treated equally, does this mean a government is democratic? No. Example: Tunisia. Under Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, women were, broadly speaking, given equal treatment. They were entitled to receive […]

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History On Our Side?

History On Our Side?

In October, the War in Afghanistan reached its 10-year anniversary. Our invasion of Afghanistan was launched as a direct result of the events of 9/11, with a goal to eradicate Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda, and the various terrorist factions based there. Rushing headlong into the fray, driven by a righteous fervor to exact revenge or […]

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Arab Spring: Winners and Losers in 2011

Arab Spring: Winners and Losers in 2011

It is still too early to determine which Arab Spring countries will eventually become successes in their government reforms and transitions and which stagnate or descend into chaos. Tunisia. With a homogeneous and well-educated citizenry, distaste for Islamist extremism, and recent free and fair elections, Tunisia stands the most to gain from the “Arab Spring.” […]

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Reassessing “Reset”

Reassessing “Reset”

Vladimir Putin, the once and future Russian president, made waves recently in an article he published in Izvestia about the desirability of a “Eurasian Union”, which would deepen and build upon the existing customs union involving Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan and potentially expanding to include Tajikistan and Kyrgyz Republic. He writes: This project also implies […]

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Winning Back Prague’s Trust

Winning Back Prague’s Trust

When Nazi troops occupied Prague in March 1939, they destroyed the city’s tribute to former United States President Woodrow Wilson. Erected in 1928, the statue commemorated U.S. support and President Wilson’s leadership in shaping the first free Czechoslovakia. After WWII, a plaque served as a placeholder in the statue’s former location until a new one […]

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A Tale of Two Ambassadors

A Tale of Two Ambassadors

It’s no secret that representing the U.S. abroad entails both risks and rewards. Ambassadors though are rarely in the news and rightly so- they are sent to represent their country, not make a name for themselves. I’m sure most people would be hard-pressed to name any ambassadors. If they are in the news it usually […]

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