Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: elections

2012: The End of the World as We Know It?

2012: The End of the World as We Know It?

Hollywood and other sects have made millions of dollars speculating on the eventual end of the world in 2012. However, should 2012 be instead seen as the year of the renouveau? Powerful states will go through a change of leadership next year; as is the case with France, the United States, China, Russia, Spain, India, […]

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The Benefits of a Constituent Assembly for Tunisia and the Arab Spring.

The Benefits of a Constituent Assembly for Tunisia and the Arab Spring.

Next month (October 23rd) the people of Tunisia will vote to elect a Constituent Assembly, with the primary task of drafting a new constitution!  The National Constituent Assembly (NCA) will be composed of 218 members, and will have to draft a new constitution for Tunisia within a year.  Furthermore, the NCS will also elect from […]

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Iran’s Foreign Policy vis-à-vis Arab Uprisings

Iran’s Foreign Policy  vis-à-vis Arab Uprisings

The following is a contributing piece from guest writer Ladan Yazdian. Ms. Yazdian is a foreign affairs and Middle East specialist. She holds a BA and an MA in political science. She is currently a Ph.D. student at Virginia Tech, working on global security, foreign policy, international relations, and human rights. In the wake of […]

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What can Turkey's secular opposition do in the elections?

What can Turkey's secular opposition do in the elections?

Originally appeared in: Political Reflection Quarterly. Volume 2, Issue 1. (Spring, 2011) H. Akın Ünver, PhD — Turkey’s opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) has been undergoing an important and profound transformation since May 2010, which began with the resignation of Deniz Baykal, the party’s chairman for more than 15 years, as a result of sex scandal allegations. Following Baykal’s resignation, […]

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Watching the endgame in Cote d'Ivoire

It was supposed to be the final stage of a nearly decade long peace process. It was supposed to finally put to rest the civil war that tore the country apart in the 1990s. It was supposed to be the start to a new chapter in Cote d’Ivoire’s history, one not marked by geographic and […]

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Accountability in Egypt

The turmoil in Egypt raises endless questions about accountability. To name a few: Is it possible for a dictator to be accountable to his people? What responsibility do Egypt’s allies have for holding him accountable? Are the massive public demonstrations currently on display doing any more for accountability than the previous status quo? Any leadership […]

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The electoral disorder of 2010

The electoral disorder of 2010

Among other things, 2010 marked a number of national elections gone wrong. From Guinea to Haiti, Rwanda to the Philippines, Madagascar, Burundi and Belarus to name just a few, elections that were fair, free, non-violent and undisputed have been difficult to find this past year. Even elections in the US and UK took on more […]

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Sunday Bland Sunday in Catalonia

Sunday Bland Sunday in Catalonia

by Meritxell Ramírez-Olle This Sunday, November 28, voters in Catalonia go to the polls. Catalonia (El Principat de Catalunya) is one of the Spain’s 17 autonomous communities with a population of 7.5 million people whose capital is Barcelona. Catalan, spoken by more than 9 million people, is the national language and has, since 2006, been […]

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Best of the Web: Time’s Power Women, Kate Moss and Sexy Socialists in Catalonia

Time magazine names 25 most powerful women of the last century, from Jane Adams to Virginia Wolf. But was it really necessary to include both Julia Child and Martha Stewart in such a short, international list? Supermodel Kate Moss is crowned best-dressed woman of the decade by U.S. Vogue. Quick, get Kate a nice juicy […]

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Election Problems Across Africa

Election Problems Across Africa

The day after I post something about the upcoming independence referendum in Sudan, election problems boil over in two other countries on the continent. The Guinean military has proclaimed a state of emergency following a disputed election earlier this month, and reports are emerging of a military coup in Madagascar this morning. On November 7, […]

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Elections: Necessary But Not Sufficient

Elections: Necessary But Not Sufficient

Today (Tuesday, November 2) is Election Day in the United States.  While it is an off-year for presidential elections, in my home state of New York the entire state legislature is up for election, governor, attorney general, comptroller, both US Senators (rare as they are usually staggered , but one is running for Hillary Clinton’s […]

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Track II Diplomacy and Election Observers: OSCE

Track II Diplomacy and Election Observers: OSCE

Earlier this month I served as a member of the US delegation to the election observation mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (overseeing presidential, parliamentary and cantonal elections held on October 3).  The observation was implemented by the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODHIR) of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) […]

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The End of an Era — Obama Salutes End to Major Combat Mission in Iraq

The End of an Era — Obama Salutes End to Major Combat Mission in Iraq

We’ve hit an emotional milestone in Iraq. The end is in sight. Major combat is over and the troops are coming home. And we can expect many more of these talks, with appearances planned throughout the month by the president, Vice President Biden and other senior administration officials as they wax eloquent on Obama’s steadfast commitment to ending the war.

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Obama Announces End of Major Combat…A round-up of news and views

Obama Announces End of Major Combat…A round-up of news and views

President Obama has given formal assurances that U.S. forces in Iraq will drop to 50,000 by the end of the month – a reduction of 94,000 troops since he took office 18 months ago. The remaining troops will form a transitional force until a final U.S. withdrawal from the country by the end of 2011. […]

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Rwanda: Unity or Repression?

Repression, certainly. The news coming out of Rwanda doesn’t look good. As the country prepares for elections in August (which current president Kagame is almost certain to win) dissident voices and opposition party leaders are feeling the heat. Last week editor-journalist Jean-Léonard Rugambage was shot dead outside his house. He worked for Umuvugizi, a banned […]

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