Foreign Policy Blogs

Global Engagement

Brain Circulation: The Globalization of Higher Education

Brain Circulation: The Globalization of Higher Education

Ben Wildavsky, Senior Fellow in Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, recently published an interesting book –  The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities are Reshaping the World. The book details just how globalization is making for better universities around the world and a competition among […]

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10 Quick Updates on the Deepwater Spill

10 Quick Updates on the Deepwater Spill

Last week I wrote broadly about the BP oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico and how it has caused an ugly collision of private companies, politicians, regulators and lobbyists.  One week later, as the oil gushes on, little has improved both in the water and in Washington.  To date, over 6 million gallons of […]

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Costa Rica's Christiana Figueres New U.N. Climate Official

Costa Rica's Christiana Figueres New U.N. Climate Official

Last Monday, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon named Costa Rica’s Christiana Figueres to be the organization’s top official on climate change.  The appointment comes after the resignation of UN climate chief Yvo de Boer, last February, considered to be a severe blow to the UN and ongoing climate negotiations. Figueres will succeed Yvo de […]

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Recommended Reading: New Report on Obama's Strategic Public Engagement

Recommended Reading: New Report on Obama's Strategic Public Engagement

The Center for a New American Security has released a report by Kristin Lord of CNAS and Marc Lynch of George Washington University.   “America’s Extended Hand:  Assessing the Obama Administration’s Global Engagement Strategy,” is well worth a thorough read.   The executive summary includes: The purpose of this report is to assess rather than recommend […]

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The Spill, The Bill and the EPA's Will

As someone who follows global climate issues for a living, the past month has been a whirlwind of incremental progress, speculation and literal explosions.  Following the daily – make that hourly –  ticker has been valuable in understanding the current climate position of the U.S. and the direction things are heading in 2010. The Issues […]

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Nuclear Links from Around the Web

Nuclear Links from Around the Web

I am interested in how the issue of nuclear non-proliferation is addressed with a variety of audiences and, to what extent, this existential discussion is driven by non-governmental organizations.   The following are a few selected links (many more are available) that highlight how this most global of matters is being engaged: 1. The Nuclear Threat […]

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Shrek, Iran and Public Diplomacy: Seeing is Believing

Shrek, Iran and Public Diplomacy: Seeing is Believing

The role of U.S. films in cultural diplomacy is not new, nor is the distribution of American films around the globe.  But those phenomena bear a reexamination every once in a while.  In this case, it is through the movie Shrek,a worldwide blockbuster (with various sequels and spin-offs).   That big green ogre has something to […]

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James Fallows on L.A. versus Beijing

James Fallows on L.A. versus Beijing

While many of us are looking towards the sea, wondering how the oil mess will get cleaned up, I thought I’d direct reader attention up from sad waters. James Fallows at the Atlantic has been adding to a useful series on his blog (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3) regarding the ever-improving air quality in […]

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Boren Awards for International Study

Boren Awards for International Study

Last week I served on the national selection panel for the Boren Fellowships of the National Security Education Program (NSEP). The fellowships are for graduate students (in rare cases for recent undergrads). NSEP also runs a scholarship program for undergrads (I know less about this).  Both are administered by the Institute for International Education. Information […]

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Turkish Foreign Policy: Old and New

Turkish Foreign Policy: Old and New

Yesterday I participated in a conference on Turkish foreign policy held at the State University of New York’s Levin Institute for International Relations and Commerce in New York City.   The event was co-sponsored by SUNY’s Office of International Programs (the office that also operates the innovative and wildly successful dual diploma program between SUNY and […]

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Happy Earth Day – A Retrospective

Happy Earth Day – A Retrospective

The photo above was taken in a U.S. Senate hearing room on April 21, 1970.  It shows (left to right), Senator Edmund Muskie (D-ME) and Senator William Proxmire (D-WI) talking with Maryland Governor Marvin Mandel, during a hearing on water pollution. Muskie and Proxmire each became known for their work on pollution regulation. Head over […]

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Climate Shocks and Exports

Climate Shocks and Exports

Loosely defined, a climate shock is a deviation from typical regional climate conditions that often results in unfavorable conditions.  From floods, droughts and cyclones to hurricanes and tsunamis, these episodes affect livelihoods in many ways. They wipe out crops, reduce opportunities for employment, ratchet up food prices and destroy property. For wealthy households shocks can […]

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The Economist on the Climate Science Battle

The Economist on the Climate Science Battle

In recent months, I’ve addressed the range of environmental anecdotes, U.S. climate “scandals” and the larger debate over the legitimacy of climate science.  Generally speaking,  it’s obvious to me that no matter your stance on the issue, waiting for 100% clarity is waiting too long. Instead, we can take very meaningful action now that, in […]

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Links From Around the Web

Treat yourself right and watch this remarkable TED video, featuring the charming and enlightening Dan Barber.  Owner of the famous Pocantico Hills farm, Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Dan is an expert in sustainable farming and an accomplished chef.  In this 20 minute video, he talks about the grim realities of “sustainable fishing.” Another shout […]

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Military Coups as a Sign of Weakness: Cook on Turkey

Military Coups as a Sign of Weakness: Cook on Turkey

Last month Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations published an excellent summary of the ongoing investigations in Turkey and how they continue to roil the politics of that country.  “The Weakening of Turkey’s Military” is available here. Those interested in the topic should also take a look at Soli Ozel’s blog at World […]

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