Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: Middle East

New Women Driving Campaign in Saudi Arabia

New Women Driving Campaign in Saudi Arabia

Since the first World conference on Women in 1975, the issue of women’s rights was brought to the international stage which led to the General Assembly’s adoption of the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). These events also coincided with the international feminist movement of the 1970s. In the […]

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A Candid Discussion with Ayham Kamel

A Candid Discussion with Ayham Kamel

Ayham Kamel is a Senior Middle East Analyst with the geopolitical risk consulting firm Eurasia Group. Mr. Kamel’s work is focused on Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and the Levant region (Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon). His sectoral expertise includes the financial industry, banking, hospitality, infrastructure, and oil and gas. He is also involved in integrating […]

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The World without US (2008)

The World without US (2008)

Now that the U.S. has been poised to strike Syria militarily, it is helpful to consider the United States’ role in the world. The premise of this documentary is intriguing: what if the United States removed all of its troops and military hardware from the dozens of bases it has all over the world? The […]

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Hamas and the Peace Process: On the Sidelines?

Hamas and the Peace Process: On the Sidelines?

By Manuel Langendorf Does Hamas hold a unified position on the use of violence for resistance? A crucial player in the conundrum that is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Hamas has always been a controversial actor. It was founded in 1987 by late Sheikh Ahmed Yassin as one of the wings of the Muslim Brotherhood in Palestine, as […]

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Strike on Syria: What Kind of World?

Strike on Syria: What Kind of World?

President Woodrow Wilson has long fascinated me. He is one of those presidents that is a giant in history, but few people know much about him. Steven Spielberg has never made a movie about him, you don’t hear his name referenced on the Sunday talk shows, and he seems entirely missing from pop-culture. And yet […]

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A Candid Discussion with Steve Rhodes

A Candid Discussion with Steve Rhodes

  As the Middle East continues to plunge in a multi-faceted and what appears to be an increasingly regional crisis, there are debates and even hope about the future of entrepreneurship in the region in the face of the Arab Spring. Corruption, the status of women, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, Iran’s nuclear program, and now the specter of […]

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The G20 on Syria: Who Represents the Victims of Chemical Attacks?

The G20 on Syria: Who Represents the Victims of Chemical Attacks?

In family courts, judges do not tend to take the position of either parent in cases that involve the health and custody of children. Judges take the position of the child as if they were of mature age and speaking to their own personal benefit and well being. We need to be reminded that over […]

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A Candid Discussion with Reza Aslan

A Candid Discussion with Reza Aslan

Dr. Reza Aslan is an internationally acclaimed American writer and scholar of religions and author, most recently, of the Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. Dr. Aslan is also the founder of Aslan Media, an online journal for news and entertainment about the Middle East and the world, and co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of […]

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Only Egyptians Should Fix Egypt

Only Egyptians Should Fix Egypt

  On July 3, 2013, in a move that shocked some members of the international community, the Egyptian military forcibly removed from power President Mohammad Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood (MB). With overwhelming support from Egyptians, the military deposed Morsi’s government, maintaining that they stepped in as a response to serious political and social unrest triggered […]

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The paucity of hope

The paucity of hope

Nothing seems to be safe in Egypt these days.  Political opponents of the military leadership are the chief targets for the attacks, attacks that include live fire from security forces. They are not alone: The seething rampages have spread to Christian churches, the media, foreigners, those held in custody, and even to the corpses waiting […]

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IranWire: Where Professional and Citizen Journalism Meet

IranWire: Where Professional and Citizen Journalism Meet

Journalism has never been an easy job. The conditions get worse when a journalist is dealing with an authoritarian government such as the Islamic Republic of Iran. The 2013 World Press Freedom Index published by Reporters Without Borders ranks the Islamic Republic of Iran 174 amongst 179 countries for its respect for media freedom. The […]

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The General’s Pretext

The General’s Pretext

The General’s Pretext Unless it is averted by transcendental intervention or by the collective effort of those who possess the political or economic capacity to influence the Egyptian Army, the stage in Egypt is set for bloody massacres, or worse, a civil war. The excerpts below would underline a thinly-veiled pretext. Today, July 24, 2013, […]

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What Will Rouhani Inherit Next Month?

What Will Rouhani Inherit Next Month?

Editor’s Note: The following is a contributing guest piece by Houchang Hassan-Yari. Dr. Hassan-Yari is Professor of international relations and strategic military studies at the Royal Military College of Canada. __________________________________________________________________ Even if the electoral vote of 50.7 percent by Hassan Rouhani is the lowest in comparison to that of his predecessors, it is mainly the context of […]

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Iran’s Egyptian Paradigm

Iran’s Egyptian Paradigm

  Egypt’s recent political shifts are likely to have mixed mixed implications for Iran. Egypt’s turmoil that was marked with the overthrow of President Mohammed Mursi on July 3, 2013 is unsettling for the volatile and war-weary and Middle East-North Africa (MENA) region. Iran’s rival, Saudi Arabia has been cheering for recent events in Cairo […]

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On Winners and Losers in Egypt’s Political Turmoil

On Winners and Losers in Egypt’s Political Turmoil

“The Brotherhood has always had many enemies, but it also has a reputation for successful grass-roots organizing and charitable work…and the Brothers are known for their financial integrity”, says Peter Hessler in a new piece in the New Yorker. Hessler digs into the history of  the Muslim Brotherhood and its rise to power as well as its organizational […]

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