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Brexit: Will the EU Botch It Again?

Brexit: Will the EU Botch It Again?

Brexit presents a new challenge to the European Union, an organization already plagued by successive and compounding crises.

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John McCain Blames ISIS on Obama

John McCain Blames ISIS on Obama

Senator McCain has blamed President Obama’s Iraq policy for the terrorist attack in Orlando, Florida. His argument doesn’t stand scrutiny.

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The Times Profile That Roiled Washington

The Times Profile That Roiled Washington

A newspaper profile of the President’s foreign policy spokesman has created an uproar based on a distorted notion of the role of foreign policy messaging.

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America’s Diplomats: Film Review by Scott Monje

America’s Diplomats: Film Review by Scott Monje

Americans have long had a disdainful attitude toward diplomacy and diplomats, seeing the whole endeavor as something elitist, foreign, expensive, and possibly deceitful.

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Did Iran Ever Actually Violate The Nonproliferation Treaty? Does It Matter?

Did Iran Ever Actually Violate The Nonproliferation Treaty? Does It Matter?

The IAEA’s final report left many observers dissatisfied: reactions to it tended to reflect people’s preexisting attitudes toward the issue.

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Obama’s Strategy, ISIS’s Coercive Diplomacy, and Escalation Dominance

Obama’s Strategy, ISIS’s Coercive Diplomacy, and Escalation Dominance

Deterrence theory may help explain ISIS’s change of strategy and also how to address it.

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The Iran Deal: Not Trusting, Verifying

The Iran Deal: Not Trusting, Verifying

There has been considerable opposition to the Iran Deal. One of the most curious assertions being made, however, is that we cannot negotiate with the Iranians because they cannot be trusted. This simply defies logic. If we trusted them, we would not need to negotiate an agreement.

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The Iran Deal: Three Unfounded Lines of Attack

The Iran Deal: Three Unfounded Lines of Attack

A great deal has been written about the agreement negotiated between Iran and the P5+1 countries. A lot of the commentary has been nonsense. Here I would like to address three unfounded lines of attack.

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The Overlooked Roots of the Greek Crisis

The Overlooked Roots of the Greek Crisis

There seems to be a widespread belief that Greece is in the trouble it is in today because it will not implement the policies that Europe has demanded of it.

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Who’s Who in Yemen

Who’s Who in Yemen

Yemen had drawn little attention in the United States, or in many other parts of the world, until recent events thrust it into the headlines.

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Netanyahu’s Speech and the Question of an Iran Deal

Netanyahu’s Speech and the Question of an Iran Deal

The prime minister was invited by the Republican leadership of Congress without the White House being informed, and he came specifically to attack one of the president’s major foreign policy initiatives, negotiations toward an arms-control accord with Iran.

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Torture as a False Moral Dilemma

Torture as a False Moral Dilemma

Many people — ordinary citizens and high-ranking government officials alike — tacitly view the torture issue as a moral dilemma. They acknowledge that the practice is morally repugnant, but they also assume that it is a fast and effective method for securing vital information that cannot otherwise be obtained.

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The Republican Congress and Foreign Policy

The Republican Congress and Foreign Policy

In case you haven’t heard, the Republicans had a strong showing in the 2014 midterm elections. They now control both houses of Congress with majorities that they have not seen in decades, setting off the next phase of an era of unusual turmoil in Congressional politics.

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WHO and the Ebola Crisis

WHO and the Ebola Crisis

It was 38 years ago, in 1976, that scientists first identified the virus. It had been found in a small village in northern Zaire (as the Democratic Republic of the Congo was called in those days) along the banks of the Ebola River.

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Germany and U.S. Intelligence: Spies, Culture, and Politics

Germany and U.S. Intelligence: Spies, Culture, and Politics

Recent revelations about espionage could have a lasting impact on U.S.-German relations. If they do, the mechanism will probably be through Germany’s domestic politics. Despite being close allies, neither country seems to understand the other side’s perspective on the issue.

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About the Author

Scott Monje
Scott Monje

Scott C. Monje, Ph.D., is senior editor of the Encyclopedia Americana (Grolier Online) and author of The Central Intelligence Agency: A Documentary History. He has taught classes on international, comparative, and U.S. politics at Rutgers University, New York University (SCPS), and Purchase College, SUNY.

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