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WHO and the Ebola Crisis

WHO and the Ebola Crisis

It was 38 years ago, in 1976, that scientists first identified the virus. It had been found in a small village in northern Zaire (as the Democratic Republic of the Congo was called in those days) along the banks of the Ebola River.

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Germany and U.S. Intelligence: Spies, Culture, and Politics

Germany and U.S. Intelligence: Spies, Culture, and Politics

Recent revelations about espionage could have a lasting impact on U.S.-German relations. If they do, the mechanism will probably be through Germany’s domestic politics. Despite being close allies, neither country seems to understand the other side’s perspective on the issue.

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Gaza: The Failure of Non-Negotiation

Gaza: The Failure of Non-Negotiation

The renewed turmoil in Gaza — the third such clash since Hamas seized power there in 2007 — has elicited a great deal of commentary, as it deserves to do. Much of it, however, focuses on the facts of the moment rather than the underlying causes. Indeed, even the fairly …

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The ISIS Story

The ISIS Story

Known today at the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, ISIS has gone through many reorganizations and name changes in the course of the past dozen years, but it has kept essentially the same goals. Although sometimes referred to as a branch of al Qaida, it is better described as …

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On Negotiations…with Terrorists and with Congress

On Negotiations…with Terrorists and with Congress

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a recently released prisoner of the Taliban, has become the target of one of Washington’s favorite games: shooting first and asking questions later. Much of what has been said  about Bergdahl is so blatantly partisan or so needlessly abusive as not to deserve comment. In the course of …

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Donbass Dilemmas

Donbass Dilemmas

People have been praising the strategy of Russian president Vladimir Putin toward eastern Ukraine and the successes that it has brought him there. Yet the more I think about it, the more I wonder how much strategy there is behind his actions and whether Putin is beginning to have second …

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Fracking, U.S. Manufacturing, and Putin’s Crimea

Fracking, U.S. Manufacturing, and Putin’s Crimea

The Russian annexation of Crimea and the continued menacing of Ukraine has given rise to a rather surprising challenge. People are calling for the United States to step up the export of domestically produced oil and, especially,

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Crimea’s Impact on Syria and Iran

Crimea’s Impact on Syria and Iran

There has been a lot of speculation lately about the impact of the Crimean Crisis on the situations in Syria and Iran. The current negotiations regarding these countries involve cooperation between Russia, the United States, and other countries now directly and indirectly involved on opposites sides of the Crimean question. …

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Crimea: The Alsace-Lorraine of the Black Sea

Crimea: The Alsace-Lorraine of the Black Sea

 
This past weekend, Russian marines in unmarked uniforms (or possibly, but less likely, private contractors paid by Russia) seized the airports of Crimea, allowing Russian planes to fly troops into that autonomous region of Ukraine while large-scale Russian military maneuvers

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Sobering Thoughts about the Prospects for Peace in Syria

Sobering Thoughts about the Prospects for Peace in Syria

The first round of Syrian peace conference known in diplomatic circles as Geneva II came to an end on Friday with few concrete results. Arguably, there have been some mildly positive effects. It gave the regime and the opposition an opportunity to compete for the sympathy of international public opinion. …

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The Tinderbox of South Sudan

The Tinderbox of South Sudan

South Sudan, the world’s youngest state, faces a serious prospect of ethnic civil war. When it gained independence from Sudan in July 2011, after decades of war between north and south, the world’s attention was focused on the disputed territory of Abyei. A declining oil-producing region Inhabited by southern farmers …

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Benghazi and the Search for Worthy Opponents

Benghazi and the Search for Worthy Opponents

The New York Times last week published a new account of the Benghazi attack, based on interviews with Libyan participants and witnesses and U.S. officials, which disputes the now widely accepted assumptions that …

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Senators Should Let Negotiators Negotiate

Senators Should Let Negotiators Negotiate

As regular readers know, the United States and five other countries (P5+1) concluded an interim nuclear agreement (the Joint Plan of Action) with Iran, setting the conditions that will hold during negotiations on a final agreement concerning the Iranian nuclear …

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China’s ADIZ; or, What the Heck Is Going On in the East China Sea?

China’s ADIZ; or, What the Heck Is Going On in the East China Sea?

China sent the diplomatic world into a spin on November 23 by declaring an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the East China Sea. This is cause for some concern, given the state of Sino-Japanese relations. …

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Musings on Iran, Syria, and Deals

Musings on Iran, Syria, and Deals

As readers already know, the P5+1 and Iran concluded an interim agreement regarding Iran’s nuclear program. This was accomplished in remarkably little time despite some reporters’ harried declarations that the talks were on

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About the Author

Scott Monje
Scott Monje

Scott C. Monje, Ph.D., is senior editor of the Encyclopedia Americana (Grolier Online) and author of The Central Intelligence Agency: A Documentary History. He has taught classes on international, comparative, and U.S. politics at Rutgers University, New York University (SCPS), and Purchase College, SUNY.

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