Foreign Policy Blogs

North Africa

So, What Happened in Morocco? 3 Big Post-Election Questions

So, What Happened in Morocco? 3 Big Post-Election Questions

Yesterday, Moroccans went to the polls for the first parliamentary elections after the Constitutional referendum earlier this summer. As I mentioned last week, there would be three questions to answer after the elections, so let’s see 1) What was the turnout? The official figure is 45%, which is definitely decent. (). The big fear was […]

read more

On Events in Egypt

On Events in Egypt

Five weeks of pretty much nonstop travel has taken its toll on, among other things, my posting and editing here at the Africa blogs. Redemption starts now! I was interviewed the other day by a reporter for The Christian Post on recent events in Egypt and you can see the resulting article here.

read more

New Faces, Better Odds

New Faces, Better Odds

Guest post by Anouar Boukhars On Friday, Morocco will hold highly anticipated parliamentary elections. The contest is widely seen as a test of royal reforms. Mohammed VI has clearly placed his bet on measured reforms to reduce social tensions and lift the country’s political malaise. By organizing early elections, the palace hopes that an influx […]

read more

Morocco’s “Dream Team Féminine”

Morocco’s “Dream Team Féminine”

As Morocco prepares for parliamentary elections this Friday, check out this campaign poster by the Party of Justice and Development (Islamists) from @__Hisham (a great person to follow on Twitter for insightful Morocco-related info, btw). It’s what some in Morocco are referring to as the PJD’s female “Dream Team.” It is, of course, interesting because […]

read more

Les Marocains are Getting Out The Vote

Les Marocains are Getting Out The Vote

So, next Friday, Morocco will be the first country in the region to hold parliamentary elections since the Arab Spring. (Tunisia’s recent election, an Islamist-strong assembly was chosen to write the new constitution. Egypt will hold parliamentary elections on Monday, November 28 to choose members of both its legislative chambers.) Morocco hasn’t received as much […]

read more

The Ibrahim Index

The Ibrahim Index

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation has just released its 2011 Index of African Governance. I’d encourage you to follow the link and download to your heart’s content. For most of you the Summary will be more than sufficient. On the whole Ibrahim himself argues, “The findings of the 2011 Index present a complex yet hopeful picture […]

read more

African Union Rejects TNC and Instead Calls For an All-Inclusive Post-Ghadafi Era, But…

African Union Rejects TNC and Instead Calls For an All-Inclusive Post-Ghadafi Era, But…

Do I see a little bit of an irony here? Let’s do a count: how many of the current AU member countries have inclusive governments? How many of the current AU member governments came to power through coups? Until now, the sad truth is that, all along, the AU (and its predecessor the OAU) did […]

read more

Libya and What Comes Next

Libya and What Comes Next

I’ve been quiet as epochal events have developed in Libya. Suffice it to say that I am cautiously optimistic — Moammar Gaddafi has been bad for Libya, bad for North Africa (ask Chadians about what Libya has meant to them over the year) and especially bad for Pan Africanism, a creed he embraced only after […]

read more

African Arguments

African Arguments

Are you reading the African Arguments network of blogs? You should be. African Arguments is a project of the Royal African Society in London, and the “intention of the site is to provide a forum for the serious analysis and discussion of contemporary African affairs with an emphasis on political life, and its impact on […]

read more

Ranking Customer Service

Ranking Customer Service

At The New York Times Magazine, Nate Silver decided to try to apply his analytical chops to the question of “where to get the world’s best service.” He basically links standard tipping rates with survey responses about the customer service people received in 24 countries. The takeaway: All of this brings us to the Tipping […]

read more

Africa Links Deluge

Africa Links Deluge

Lots of stories have been cavorting around my head, with commentary as I see fit: The disaster in the Horn of Africa represents what the Mail & Guardian calls “a crisis in slow motion.” The perfect storm of famine and the political chaos in Somalia has led to a humanitarian nightmare. The west (ie the […]

read more

Risks to Stability in Sub-Saharan Africa

Risks to Stability in Sub-Saharan Africa

Quoted directly from John Campbell at his Council on Foreign Relations’ Africa in Transition blog: The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) has released ten case studies on “Assessing Risks to Stability in Sub-Saharan Africa.” The reports cover Angola, Botswana, Ethiopia,  Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sudan and Uganda. The papers, commissioned by the U.S. […]

read more

One is the loneliest number . . .

One is the loneliest number . . .

Earlier this month, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s reminded the world of the unchanged US support for Morocco’s “serious, realistic, and credible” compromise autonomy proposal to end the three-decades old Western Sahara conflict.  Days after, two more countries officially withdrew recognition and support of the “Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic” (SADR) “the pseudo country” run […]

read more

The Use Force in Libya

For the first time in its history, the United Nations Security Council unanimously passed a resolution allowing the use of force on a sovereign state. Political analysts and legal scholars argue that the international military intervention in Libya has legal grounds but still raises immense political and legal debates. There are evolving discussion on the […]

read more

A Royal Review: Dissecting The Speech of Morocco's Mohammed VI

After three weeks of protests, where enthusiastic demonstrators took to the streets of Rabat, Casablanca, Agadir, Tangier, and Marrakech, demanding a freer and more transparent political process, word came that His Majesty King Mohammed VI would appear on state television to deliver a speech. I was on a bus from Agadir to Rabat when I got the news and I made a mad dash to reach the nearest television, hoping to hear what would be a historic oration.

read more

Great Decisions Discussion group