Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: Israel

GailForce: Egypt/Israel/Palestine – Never Ending Crisis

GailForce:  Egypt/Israel/Palestine – Never Ending Crisis

  I have been off the blogosphere this month because of foreign travel and poor internet connectivity.  Ironically, two of the countries I visited were Egypt and Israel.  The current crisis broke out a couple of days after I returned home.  As I write this blog a ceasefire announced last week by Egyptian Foreign Minister […]

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War in the 21st Century

War in the 21st Century

Operation Pillar of Defense appears to be over, thanks to a ceasefire brokered by Egypt. There have been flareups in the few days since the ceasefire was agreed upon, but for now it seems to be holding. There were significantly less Israeli and Palestinian casualties from this conflict then there were in the last full […]

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Israel’s Right to Defend Itself: Response to Ms. Vahidy’s Op-ed Piece

Israel’s Right to Defend Itself: Response to Ms. Vahidy’s Op-ed Piece

  Editor’s Note:  The following is a guest opinion piece by Roz Rothstein and Roberta P. Seid. Roz Rothstein  is the CEO of StandWithUs and Roberta P. Seid, PhD is Director of Research at StandWithUs. It is an op-ed response to Ms. Ayesha Vahidy’s recent op-ed piece.  _____________________________________________________________ Ms. Vahidy’s outrage should be with Hamas, not Israel.  […]

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Israel and the Right to Defend Itself

Israel and the Right to Defend Itself

Editor’s Note:  The following is a guest opinion piece by Ayesha Vahidy. Ms. Vahidy is currently working towards her Masters degree in International development at the University of British Columbia in Canada. She holds a BA in Political Science from York University in Toronto, Ontario. Ms. Vahidy works as a consultant in diversity at public […]

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Cease-fires and the Diplomatic Long Game

Cease-fires and the Diplomatic Long Game

Currently an attempt to maintain a cease-fire between Israel and the Gaza Strip is taking shape, with conditions based on the halt of rocket fire and artillery from both sides. An obvious conclusion to create a cease-fire is to stop shooting, but the roots of a cease-fire comes from a balance of diplomacy and the […]

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Gaza and the post-Arab Spring Order

Gaza and the post-Arab Spring Order

  Israel’s attack on Hamas in the Gaza Strip has not elicited a strong response from the Arab world. It is as if the Arab Spring has not yet brought an intense focus on one of the core issues of Arab politics, as many assumed it would. While Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi and his Tunisian […]

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If Western Leaders Weren’t Worried About Turkey Before, They Should Be Now

If Western Leaders Weren’t Worried About Turkey Before, They Should Be Now

Over the decades the opportunistic Turkey has dictated its Middle Eastern relations based on shifts in the regional balance of power. In the early 1990s up until around 2006, Turkey was finely enmeshed in Western sentiments and policies. But beginning in 2006 it recognized a leadership vacuum in the Middle East and began attempting to […]

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Is There a Real Reason Israel Would Get Involved in Syria?

Is There a Real Reason Israel Would Get Involved in Syria?

As most media outlets are reporting, over the last month several errant mortars have been fired into Israel’s Golan Heights from Syria.  The IDF has determined many of them can be traced back to forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Showing restraint the Jewish state chose not to respond believing that the shells were […]

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10 Foreign Policy Issues Facing Obama

10 Foreign Policy Issues Facing Obama

Despite the fact that it’s only the 9th of November, election day is far behind us.  There’s no option of a lame duck for any officials.  The glaringly obvious and ever-pressing question is, of course, what now?  Or, to put it another way, where? Some of the “whats” have snuck their way into kitchen table […]

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The Impact of Sanctions on Iranians and Government Policies

The Impact of Sanctions on Iranians and Government Policies

Iran has been a major foreign policy issue for all U.S. administrations over the past three decades. In tonight’s last Presidential debate before the elections, Iran is bound to come up as one of the key foreign policy challenges that needs to be tackled. Will there be a change in the Iranian government’s policies as […]

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The Start of a New Trend? Saudi Writer and Former Royal Naval Officer Urges Arab Population to Re-Consider Stance on Israel

The Start of a New Trend? Saudi Writer and Former Royal Naval Officer Urges Arab Population to Re-Consider Stance on Israel

Three days ago Adulateef Al-Mulhim, a writer at ArabNews.com and a former Royal Saudi Naval officer, wrote a ground breaking op-ed called the “Arab Spring and the Israel Enemy.” In it he calls for the Arab population and their governments to stop demonizing and blaming Israel as the source of their problems. “The Arab world […]

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Foreign Policy Association’s Candidate Selector

Foreign Policy Association’s Candidate Selector

Thanks to the hard work of several of our bloggers, Foreign Policy Association’s election guide and candidate selector is up! Focusing on the foreign policy views of incumbent President Barack Obama and the opposition challenger, Mitt Romney, the Foreign Policy Association’s bloggers provide readers with background and analysis on the five most-debated topics facing American […]

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Canada’s Inappropriate Iran Policy

Canada’s Inappropriate Iran Policy

by Alireza Ahmadian Editor’s Note: Alireza Ahmadian is an Iranian-Canadian writer living in London. Mr. Ahmadian holds a history BA from the University of British Columbia and is currently completing his postgraduate studies at the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.   Canada’s decision to […]

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Jerusalem Court’s ‘Innocence’ Petition Rejection and Thoughts on Accountability

Jerusalem Court’s ‘Innocence’ Petition Rejection and Thoughts on Accountability

The following was taken from Jspace.com.  The article was written by Jspace Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Rob Lattin, who also blogs about Israeli and Middle Eastern foreign policy for Foreign Policy Blogs.  The Jerusalem District court last Thursday rejected MK Taleb al-Sanaa, of the United Arab List party, and others’ petition calling for a temporary injunction […]

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CDC, U.S. Health System Bungles WNV: Biosecurity Belongs to the Military

CDC, U.S. Health System Bungles WNV: Biosecurity Belongs to the Military

Bite me. You might as well go outside and shout it loud, because there isn’t enough DEET in your medicine chest to fend off the bloodlust of Culex pipiens, Anopheles, Aedes vexans, and dozens of other species of infected mosquitoes blanketing the United States. And West Nile virus season has just begun—consider August 2012 a preview.

Don’t get me wrong. Health organizations, federal, state and local, have spent buckets of money on nice-looking, easy-to-understand websites that calmly advise citizens to douse ourselves with bug spray, wear light, long-sleeved clothing (think Out of Africa), eliminate standing pools of water, and, of course, just stay inside the damn house until the Center for Disease Control (CDC) sounds the all-clear.

All good. But hardly sufficient.

West Nile virus—how it got here, how it travels, how it kills, and how health officials could, but often fail to mount the most effective responses—is a complicated story, a cautionary tale, some would say, about power, ego, bureaucracy, preparedness, ignorance, incompetence, and disparate champions whose voices routinely go unheard and whose counsel is too often ignored.

Right now, the highbeams are on Dallas, Texas, ‘Ground Zero’ for West Nile—and Mayor Mike Rawlings has indeed declared a state of emergency in the municipality. As the number of victims escalates, however, so does the anxiety of state and local officials, as well as the complaints of constituents, who’ve begun to question and criticize the city’s response to the health crisis….

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