Foreign Policy Blogs

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How recruiters get in a bad mood when reviewing applicants

How recruiters get in a bad mood when reviewing applicants

Recruiters are on tight schedules, and when reviewing a potential candidate for a job, have to move quickly. This often means taking only a few minutes to scan resumes before deciding on who will be invited for an interview, or who will be referred to the hiring agent.

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A Candid Discussion with Ambassador Christopher Hill

A Candid Discussion with Ambassador Christopher Hill

Ambassador Hill sat down with Reza Akhlaghi of the Foreign Policy Association to discuss his new book and share his views on U.S. foreign policy.

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Developments in America’s Backyard

Developments in America’s Backyard

Latin America often receives secondary attention with the world’s focus on the Middle East. For North Americans, however, issues with regional partners may have more weight on the average person in the U.S. and Canada than problems in Iraq and Ukraine.

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On ‘China’s rising influence in Djibouti [which] is causing a souring in the African nation’s relations with the West’

On ‘China’s rising influence in Djibouti [which] is causing a souring in the African nation’s relations with the West’

The following is a response by the government of Djibouti to the Oct. 17, 2014 post "China's war for Africa's hearts and minds"

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Investments Taking Precedence Over Rights

Investments Taking Precedence Over Rights

A silent controversy is taking place in my community in Canada as the leaders of some of the Provinces in Canada plan to set off on a trade mission to China.

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WHO and the Ebola Crisis

WHO and the Ebola Crisis

It was 38 years ago, in 1976, that scientists first identified the virus. It had been found in a small village in northern Zaire (as the Democratic Republic of the Congo was called in those days) along the banks of the Ebola River.

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Northern Winds Upset Hungary’s “Illiberal Revolution”

Northern Winds Upset Hungary’s “Illiberal Revolution”

In his most recent flamboyant sign of making a clear break with the past, Viktor Orbán, Hungary’s Prime Minister, has taken the unexpected step of moving out of the Hungarian equivalent of the White House, choosing instead a not-too-shabby castle in the historical Buda Castle District, the former place of residence for Hungary’s kings of yore.

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The FPA’s Must Reads (September 5-12)

The FPA’s Must Reads (September 5-12)

Our favorite longreads and blog posts from the past week.

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Russia Unhinged? Why the World’s Leaders Must Take a Stand

Russia Unhinged? Why the World’s Leaders Must Take a Stand

Neither Russia’s violation of its international legal obligations nor its institutional blockade of the U.N. Security Council can possibly be in the interest of the other U.N. member states, least of all in the interest of the less mighty among them. Hence, when the world’s leaders gather for this year’s opening of the United Nations’ 69th General Assembly they would be well-advised to address this dual attack on the foundations of global governance.

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Why Russia Intervenes

Why Russia Intervenes

Far from being an anomalous event, Russia’s coercive military pressure on Ukraine in the aftermath of the Maidan revolution is typical of the way great powers, including the United States, have behaved in the past.

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2014 NATO Summit: ‘Crucial’ to Say the Least

2014 NATO Summit: ‘Crucial’ to Say the Least

As the leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) convene in Wales for a two-day conference, the world watches how the most important and powerful joint-military and political alliance will handle the myriad of problems it must face in many corners of the globe. With Russia knocking ...

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The FPA’s Must Reads (August 9–15)

The FPA’s Must Reads (August 9–15)

Our five favorite longreads and blog posts from the past week.

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The pitfalls of sanctions and financial warfare

The pitfalls of sanctions and financial warfare

Sanctions are all the rage in contemporary foreign policy circles. Following interventions in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, Western populations rightly are less and less supportive of direct military action, especially of any initiative involving “boots on the ground.” Sanctions provide a tempting policy solution to decision makers all too conscious of public ...

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The Dangers of Investing in Conflicted Areas

The Dangers of Investing in Conflicted Areas

Investments in Colombia in the ’80s and ’90s were often limited to large multinational companies. These companies would take the risks to mine in Colombia’s regions despite the dangers present to their employees. On many occasions, Colombians and foreign nationals were kidnapped for ransom, and many international workers and influential Colombians ...

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Candid Discussions: Reza Marashi on U.S.-Iran Relations and Regional Dynamics

Candid Discussions: Reza Marashi on U.S.-Iran Relations and Regional Dynamics

  Reza Marashi is Research Director at the National Iranian American Council (NIAC).  Prior to NIAC, Mr. Marashi worked in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.  He was also a political analyst at the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS), covering ...

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