Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: Canada

Canadian and American military exercises reveal gap between countries in Arctic capabilities

Canadian and American military exercises reveal gap between countries in Arctic capabilities

Canada: Operation Nunalivut The Canadian Forces have just commenced one of their annual sovereignty exercises in the Arctic, called Operation Nunalivut. 150 Canadian Forces personnel from the Navy, Air Force, Army, and Canadian Rangers are participating. This year, the exercises are taking place around Cornwallis Island and on the western portion of Devon Island in […]

read more

International Polar Year 2012 conference underway in Montreal

International Polar Year 2012 conference underway in Montreal

I’ve just returned from the first day of proceedings at the International Polar Year 2012 conference in Montreal. Entitled “From Knowledge to Action,” the conference features panels, plenaries, action forums, indigenous exchange forums, and poster sessions about the current state of the poles. Reflecting the conference’s title, speakers are emphasizing how to implement the knowledge […]

read more

Arctic chiefs of defense agree to closer search and rescue cooperation

Arctic chiefs of defense agree to closer search and rescue cooperation

On Thursday and Friday, the chiefs of defense from all eight Arctic states met at a Canadian military base in Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador to discuss forging closer ties up north.  This was the first time that generals from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the U.S. convened. The meeting will now […]

read more

Canadian dollar now “not on the table” for Iceland

Canadian dollar now “not on the table” for Iceland

In early March, a few outspoken voices in Iceland, a country not known for its stable economy in recent years, floated the idea of switching from the krona to the Canadian dollar. The leader of the opposition Progressive Party, Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson, said, “If we are going to adopt another currency, then the Canadian dollar looks […]

read more

Syrian American Council Urges a Crackdown on Assad’s Regime

Syrian American Council Urges a Crackdown on Assad’s Regime

  Since the reign of terror from President Bashar-al Assad’s regime began the UN estimates that over 9,000 innocent Syrian civilians have died at his hands. The local coordination committees estimate that the number of those killed is upwards of 11,000 in addition to those who are injured or incarcerated. Syria has accepted a peace plan from […]

read more

Illness and Elections: Does it Make a Difference?

Illness and Elections: Does it Make a Difference?

In 2011 Jack Layton, the left of center leader of Canada’s New Democratic Party, changed the political landscape of Canada by campaigning for his party’s position as the third party in the Canadian political system. The New Democrats, known as the NDP, always was Canada’s third party behind the Conservative Party and Canada’s natural governing […]

read more

Obama Administration Delays Keystone XL Pipeline Decision

Obama Administration Delays Keystone XL Pipeline Decision

The Keystone XL Pipeline extension proposed by TransCanada is current in planning limbo after the November 10 decision by the Obama administration not to make a decision on going ahead with or killing it. If and when built, it would bring crude from Alberta, Canada’s oils sands to the Gulf Coast of the US. The […]

read more

Canada’s National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy: New Capabilities for Arctic

Canada’s National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy: New Capabilities for Arctic

The Canadian government recently announced the results of the bidding process to construct vessels for the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Canada plans to spend $33 billion on 28 large combat and non-combat vessels over the next 30 years. As part of that procurement the Royal Canadian Navy is slated to receive six to eight Arctic […]

read more

Canadian Icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent Heading South For Repairs

Canadian Icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent Heading South For Repairs

The flagship of Canada’s aging fleet of icebreakers suffered mechanical failure to its center propeller on September 19 and has been anchored off the coast of Cambridge Bay, Nunavut since September 27. The 42-year old St-Laurent had been on a joint mission with the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Healy to conduct bathymetric surveys and mapping of the […]

read more

‘The Path of Glory Leads but to the Grave’: The Most Important Battle Ever Fought in the History of Transatlantic Relations

‘The Path of Glory Leads but to the Grave’: The Most Important Battle Ever Fought in the History of Transatlantic Relations

On a moonless night in the morning hours of September 13, 1759, a procession of boats steered silently down the St. Lawrence River. The boats contained the small British expeditionary force under the command of 32-year-old, red-haired Major-General James Wolfe, who in a low voice repeated line after line of Thomas Gray’s ‘Elegy in Country […]

read more

The Northwest Passage versus the Northern Sea Route

The Northwest Passage versus the Northern Sea Route

Earlier this month, France’s former prime minister Michel Rocard, now French Ambassador for the Arctic and Antarctic, toured the Arctic aboard the Canadian icebreaker Amundsen. Rocard did not have high praise for his host’s capacities up north. He stated, “I have the impression that Canada has given up on the competition to attract a large […]

read more

Pollution, Shipping, and Kindergartens in the Russian Arctic

Pollution, Shipping, and Kindergartens in the Russian Arctic

At the same June 30 regional conference of the United Russia party in Yekaterinburg where Vladimir Putin defended Russia’s growing presence in the Arctic, he spoke about his vision for developing the region. He focused on environmental restoration in the Arctic waterways and on natural gas development. First, he called for a “big cleanup” in […]

read more

Quebec's Charest May Find His Legacy in the Far North

It seems that politicians spend most of their time trying to get elected and re-elected. After a few terms in office, though, they start to focus more on their legacy – less on what the voters think of them, and more on what historians will think of them. For some, their legacy is changing the […]

read more

Alberta's Energy Minister Visits US to Spur Investment

Last week, Alberta’s Energy Minister Ron Liepert was in the US to promote his province’s energy sector. During breakfast at the Penn Club in Manhattan organized by the Canadian Consulate-General, he discussed a wide array of energy-related subjects. The message he had for US foreign policy was simply that Alberta (and by extension Canada as […]

read more

"The Big Grab" – The Tar Sands vs. The Rest of Canada

"The Big Grab" – The Tar Sands vs. The Rest of Canada

There is an important series well underway at the Vancouver Observer:  “The Big Grab.”  It’s about how the tar sands industry is forcing choices on Canadians that they would not otherwise have to make in the absence of all the activity in Alberta.  What’s particularly important about this series, it seems to me, is that […]

read more

Great Decisions Discussion group

About Us

Foreign Policy Blogs is a network of global affairs blogs and a supplement to the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions program. Staffed by professional contributors from the worlds of journalism, academia, business, non-profits and think tanks, the FPB network tracks global developments on Great Decisions 2014 topics, daily. The FPB network is a production of the Foreign Policy Association.

Blog Authors

FPA Administrator