Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: Egypt

Only Egyptians Should Fix Egypt

Only Egyptians Should Fix Egypt

  On July 3, 2013, in a move that shocked some members of the international community, the Egyptian military forcibly removed from power President Mohammad Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood (MB). With overwhelming support from Egyptians, the military deposed Morsi’s government, maintaining that they stepped in as a response to serious political and social unrest triggered […]

read more

The paucity of hope

The paucity of hope

Nothing seems to be safe in Egypt these days.  Political opponents of the military leadership are the chief targets for the attacks, attacks that include live fire from security forces. They are not alone: The seething rampages have spread to Christian churches, the media, foreigners, those held in custody, and even to the corpses waiting […]

read more

On the Ground in Egypt: Two Views from Two Egyptians

On the Ground in Egypt: Two Views from Two Egyptians

Credit: Wikimedia Commons Ramy Peter and Yazan Amin,* both Egyptian, spent five weeks in America over the summer on a program called the Study of the U.S. Institute on Religious Pluralism and Democracy (based in Philadelphia), where they studied religious pluralism, democracy and dialogue. They have been back in Egypt since late July. Peter, 22, […]

read more

The Politics of Political Islam

The Politics of Political Islam

I don’t know who deserves the attribution as far as the coining is concerned, I only know—like the terms Islamism, sharia, and jihad — so-called political Islam is a loaded term that stirs storms of controversy. Despite that baggage, it is the prevalent concept that defines all political parties and movements with Islamic references. This […]

read more

The General’s Pretext

The General’s Pretext

The General’s Pretext Unless it is averted by transcendental intervention or by the collective effort of those who possess the political or economic capacity to influence the Egyptian Army, the stage in Egypt is set for bloody massacres, or worse, a civil war. The excerpts below would underline a thinly-veiled pretext. Today, July 24, 2013, […]

read more

Iran’s Egyptian Paradigm

Iran’s Egyptian Paradigm

  Egypt’s recent political shifts are likely to have mixed mixed implications for Iran. Egypt’s turmoil that was marked with the overthrow of President Mohammed Mursi on July 3, 2013 is unsettling for the volatile and war-weary and Middle East-North Africa (MENA) region. Iran’s rival, Saudi Arabia has been cheering for recent events in Cairo […]

read more

How U.S. fits in to Egypt events (if at all)

How U.S. fits in to Egypt events (if at all)

Two weeks after Mohamed Morsi was ousted as the leader of Egypt, chaos still reigns. According to state-run media, seven people died on Monday, July 15, in violent skirmishes between Morsi supporters and opponents. An interim government is trying to instill some sense of ruling stability, but the widely supported Muslim Brotherhood (Morsi’s party) and […]

read more

On Winners and Losers in Egypt’s Political Turmoil

On Winners and Losers in Egypt’s Political Turmoil

“The Brotherhood has always had many enemies, but it also has a reputation for successful grass-roots organizing and charitable work…and the Brothers are known for their financial integrity”, says Peter Hessler in a new piece in the New Yorker. Hessler digs into the history of  the Muslim Brotherhood and its rise to power as well as its organizational […]

read more

Sometimes a cigar is just a stogie

Sometimes a cigar is just a stogie

  This past week was one that offered sharp reminders that – under the veneer of white papers and white lies — reality can bite. In other words – hello, why are you surprised at these “surprises.” Let’s start with an easy one. Who is surprised that at least some elements of Pakistan’s government probably […]

read more

Egypt’s Revolution has the potential to surpass Syrian violence

Egypt’s Revolution has the potential to surpass Syrian violence

To coup or not to coup? Who cares? Whatever label it is being given, coup or revolution, what the Egyptian military accomplished less than one week ago is removing a government supposedly democratically elected. This comes on the heels of a previous removal of a long-standing dictator — Hosni Mubarak —  just over two years […]

read more

Egypt after the Coup

Egypt after the Coup

Recent events in Egypt have been tumultuous, to say the least. The country’s first elected president in history was deposed by the military three days after his first anniversary in office. The International Crisis Group’s description of current Egyptian politics gives the impression of a grand competition in short-sightedness. What happens next will depend on […]

read more

Did Obama’s Africa tour make the right stops?

Did Obama’s Africa tour make the right stops?

Apparently President Obama has received some criticism over taking the “easy road” in his visit to Africa earlier this week. Instead of drawing attention to more troubled spots on the continent such as Nigeria or Kenya, he choose to visit the relatively safe, stable, and democratically potent (at least in terms of Africa) Tanzania, South […]

read more

Euphoria Eclipses Nightmare in Egypt

Euphoria Eclipses Nightmare in Egypt

Today, Egypt is a dangerously polarized nation that is on the brink of a civil war. And, that worst case scenario could have broad implications far beyond that country and the Middle East. Since the military coup d’etat, the situation in Egypt has been rapidly escalating into a dangerous political dichotomy- all against the Muslim […]

read more

There’s trouble in River City, and it’s spelled D-A-M

There’s trouble in River City, and it’s spelled D-A-M

There is a village in Afghanistan by the name of Kobakai, a few winding hours from Kabul, where the lives of the residents changed because of one thing: water. With help from outside groups such as CARE, one morning the residents of Kobakai (ko-BAH-ki) woke to find that beginning that day they would not have […]

read more

Unrest in the Middle East: A Conversation With Siddique and Wuite

Unrest in the Middle East: A Conversation With Siddique and Wuite

by Abul-Hasanat Siddique and Casper Wuite Abul-Hasanat Siddique and Casper Wuite, co-authors of The Arab Uprisings: An Introduction, talk about the political unrest in the Middle East, the Syrian Civil War, the globalization of media, and the future prospects for the region. Is the unrest in the Middle East and North Africa homegrown or a Western-sponsored revolution for change? Abul-Hasanat Siddique: Home-grown. […]

read more

americasdiplomats_socialmediaasset

About Us

Foreign Policy Blogs is a network of global affairs blogs and a supplement to the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions program. Staffed by professional contributors from the worlds of journalism, academia, business, non-profits and think tanks, the FPB network tracks global developments on Great Decisions 2014 topics, daily. The FPB network is a production of the Foreign Policy Association.

Blog Authors

FPA Administrator