Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: Egypt

Democratic struggles around the world

Democratic struggles around the world

      The fragility of democracy has been on full display this week. Distressingly, challenges to freedom and order have occurred literally around the globe. Here is an overview of situations to monitor; all of these stories broke today, Wed. March 6, 2013. Venezuela I would be remiss to not start with the March […]

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Egypt Floods Gaza Smuggling Tunnels With Water and Sewage: What’s Going On Behind the Scenes?

Egypt Floods Gaza Smuggling Tunnels With Water and Sewage: What’s Going On Behind the Scenes?

The Egyptian government is quite busy these days dealing with continued unrest, instability, and economic woes. Yet it has somehow found both the will and the resources to flood some of the smuggling tunnels between Egypt and Gaza. Former president Hosni Mubarak’s regime attempted on a few occasions to destroy the tunnels, but this policy […]

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Will the Turmoil in Egypt lead to Civil War?

Will the Turmoil in Egypt lead to Civil War?

On February 11, 2011, approximately two years ago, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down as the supreme leader of Egypt after a reign that lasted 30 years. His rise to the pinnacle of the country’s power structure came following the 1981 assasination of his predecessor, Anwar Sadat. This was considered the culmination of the Arab […]

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Shades of Grey in U.S. Policy towards North Africa

Shades of Grey in U.S. Policy towards North Africa

“The United States is struggling to confront an uptick in threats from the world’s newest jihadist hot spot with limited intelligence and few partners to help as the Obama administration weighs how to keep Islamic extremists in North Africa from jeopardizing national security without launching war. We want to put up a map here and […]

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The FPA’s Must Reads from Around the Web (January 18-25)

The FPA’s Must Reads from Around the Web (January 18-25)

Articles From Around the Web   The Force By Jill Lepore The New Yorker Once a country that regarded a large standing army as a form of tyranny, the United State’s has now become one of the largest spenders on defense — and its military spending exceeds all of the nation’s in the world combined. […]

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Fraud allegations hang over Egypt’s constitution vote

Fraud allegations hang over Egypt’s constitution vote

Just look to Egypt for the latest proof that the road to democracy is rocky and perilous. After weeks of protests and concerns over President Mohamed Morsi assuming expansive presidential powers–which I covered here–assertions of foul play during that the past weekend’s national constitutional referendum have come to light. Voter turnout is estimated at just […]

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GailForce: Egypt/Israel/Palestine – Never Ending Crisis

GailForce:  Egypt/Israel/Palestine – Never Ending Crisis

  I have been off the blogosphere this month because of foreign travel and poor internet connectivity.  Ironically, two of the countries I visited were Egypt and Israel.  The current crisis broke out a couple of days after I returned home.  As I write this blog a ceasefire announced last week by Egyptian Foreign Minister […]

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Has Egypt’s Morsi gone too far?

Has Egypt’s Morsi gone too far?

Egypt’s fragile young democracy seems on a knife’s edge after President Mohamed Morsi decreed that decisions he makes until a parliament is instituted are not subject to judicial review. Morsi’s camp insists this measure is necessary to protect the democratically chosen assembly working to agree on and draft a constitution, which faces opposition from judges […]

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Cease-fires and the Diplomatic Long Game

Cease-fires and the Diplomatic Long Game

Currently an attempt to maintain a cease-fire between Israel and the Gaza Strip is taking shape, with conditions based on the halt of rocket fire and artillery from both sides. An obvious conclusion to create a cease-fire is to stop shooting, but the roots of a cease-fire comes from a balance of diplomacy and the […]

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Gaza and the post-Arab Spring Order

Gaza and the post-Arab Spring Order

  Israel’s attack on Hamas in the Gaza Strip has not elicited a strong response from the Arab world. It is as if the Arab Spring has not yet brought an intense focus on one of the core issues of Arab politics, as many assumed it would. While Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi and his Tunisian […]

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If Western Leaders Weren’t Worried About Turkey Before, They Should Be Now

If Western Leaders Weren’t Worried About Turkey Before, They Should Be Now

Over the decades the opportunistic Turkey has dictated its Middle Eastern relations based on shifts in the regional balance of power. In the early 1990s up until around 2006, Turkey was finely enmeshed in Western sentiments and policies. But beginning in 2006 it recognized a leadership vacuum in the Middle East and began attempting to […]

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Guest Post – “Egypt: Challenges of Crafting Leadership in Foreign Affairs” by Jean AbiNader

Guest Post – “Egypt: Challenges of Crafting Leadership in Foreign Affairs” by Jean AbiNader

In today’s Guest Post, Jean AbiNader shares his interesting perspective on a recent article on Egypt by former Egyptian Ambassador to the U.S., Nabil Fahmy which appeared in the summer 2012 issue of the Cairo Review of Global Affairs. Jean, a long-time Middle East specialist, is President of IdeaCom, Inc. (www.goideacom.com) and directs its services […]

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This Is No Spontaneous Uprising

This Is No Spontaneous Uprising

Over the last several decades, a variety of movements have arisen in the Arab and Islamic countries–a radical nationalism (Baath socialist, Marxist, pan-Arab, and so forth) and a series of Islamist movements (meaning Islamic fundamentalism in a political version). The movements have varied hugely and have even gone to war with one another–Iran’s Shiite Islamists […]

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GailForce: War on Any Given Day – Libya

GailForce:  War on Any Given Day – Libya

A couple of weeks ago, I was surprised to get a phone call inviting me to the Democratic Convention to hear President Obama give his acceptance speech.  I’m a registered independent voter and over the course of my life have voted for candidates of both parties.  Attending the convention was one of the best experiences […]

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Struggle for the Sinai

Struggle for the Sinai

by Max Reibman  Muhammad Moursi’s exploitation of recent events in the Sinai to shuffle the leadership of the Egyptian military is only the most recent manifestation of the disproportionate influence of the Sinai on Egyptian politics. Events in the Sinai have long dictated politics in Cairo. For decades, they shaped the fortunes of powerbrokers in the […]

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