Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: Egypt

A tale of two African democracies

A tale of two African democracies

After recently covering Ethiopia (here and here), I thought I’d stay in Africa for this article. I want to look at two nations with a wide space between them in terms of geography, culture, political ideology and democracy (i.e., government) itself. Basically, they’re as far apart from each other as you can be in Africa, […]

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Kippur (2000)

Kippur (2000)

This film is almost a documentary. It follows two Israeli medics who are sent to the front lines during the 1973 Yom Kippur war that began when Egypt and Syria attacked Israel. This movie, which is in Hebrew with English subtitles, is not political. Rather, it is a study of life in wartime and the […]

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Avigdor Lieberman: Lame Duck Diplomacy

Avigdor Lieberman: Lame Duck Diplomacy

The following was taken from Jspace.com.  The article was written by Jspace Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Rob Lattin, who also blogs about Israeli and Middle Eastern foreign policy for Foreign Policy Blogs.  On Thursday, Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman re-emphasized his belief that the Palestinian Authority should hold general elections, and continued his criticism of Mahmoud […]

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U.S. Financial Support for Democratic Transition in the Middle East

U.S. Financial Support for Democratic Transition in the Middle East

Currently, a key question for U.S. policymakers is how to engage with and/or support new governments in Egypt, Libya and Tunisia. For those of you interested in the topic of U.S. foreign assistance to the Middle East, I strongly recommend a new Project on Middle East Democracy (POMED) paper, The Federal Budget and Appropriations for […]

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Middle East Realignment: Great Decision’s Takeaways

Middle East Realignment: Great Decision’s Takeaways

I recently had the pleasure of leading a Great Decision’s group meeting that covered Augustus Norton’s chapter on the Middle East Realignment, AKA “Arab Spring: Where are We Now”? Our group had an excellent discussion and, as could be expected, jumped around to numerous subtopics within this wide ranging theme. We tried to go through […]

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Election Logistics in Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia

Election Logistics in Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia

While much of what is immediately important about a democratic election is whether it was sufficiently free from corruption and interference for voters to decide the outcome, the devil is sometimes in the details. Seemingly minor bureaucratic and logistical concerns can threaten the value of an otherwise legitimate democratic exercise. Even in the United States, […]

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Lines Between Unelected and Elected Democracy: Mexico, Paraguay, and Egypt Compared

Lines Between Unelected and Elected Democracy: Mexico, Paraguay, and Egypt Compared

The end of the Arab Spring has likely come about in two different ways. The official election of President Morsi in Egypt can be seen as the end of protests against the military government and the beginning of the first democratically elected leader in Egypt’s history, or it can become the beginning of a one […]

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Developments Suggest Turkey May Realign With Israel

Developments Suggest Turkey May Realign With Israel

The following was taken from Jspace.com.  The article was written by Jspace Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Rob Lattin, who also blogs about Israeli and Middle Eastern foreign policy for Foreign Policy Blogs.  With all of the turmoil and uncertainty going on in the Middle East right now, the state of Israeli-Turkish relations has largely been under-reported and under-analyzed. While […]

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Transitional Justice in the Arab World

Transitional Justice in the Arab World

The Arab Spring, or rather the Arab Uprising, has made history.  Future generations will study this brave series of uprisings as a new chapter in the history of the Middle East-North African (MENA) region. Current generations are both proud and anxious as they watch history unfold before their eyes. Governments throughout the world are worriedly […]

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SCAF Power Grab Highlights Transitional Difficulties in Egypt

SCAF Power Grab Highlights Transitional Difficulties in Egypt

One political earthquake after another is rumbling through Egypt. Things here seem to change on a daily basis, sometimes even on an hourly basis, as has been the case in the recent week. In fact as of late, Cairo feels a bit like the Twilight Zone, particularly in light of conflicting reports about whether or […]

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Continued Transitions for Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia

Continued Transitions for Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia

The international relations history buffs among you probably know the story of former Chinese premier Zhou Enlai’s quip about the French Revolution: when someone asked him about the revolution on one of President Nixon’s trips to China in the early 1970s, he said that it was “too soon to say.” Last year, a former foreign […]

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Is the Mediterranean the World’s Messiest Neighborhood? And the Mid-Life Crisis of the EU?

Is the Mediterranean the World’s Messiest Neighborhood? And the Mid-Life Crisis of the EU?

What to watch this weekend: the US golf open in San Francisco, the Euro 2012, the third game of the NBA Finals–Go Heat–or the latest Ridley Scott’s Prometheus? In fact the place to look and observe should be the Mediterranean. This weekend the world will be watching, especially in the US and Europe, the outcomes […]

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As we thought. Not.

As we thought. Not.

We are now deep into year two of the Arab world convulsions. Not one country across the North African-Middle East arc is settled. Even where it sounds quiet it is not. Two years from the first cry of freedom, very few things are how the outside world predicted. As Egyptians vote for their president in […]

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Updates on Women, Children, and Human Rights Around the Globe

Updates on Women, Children, and Human Rights Around the Globe

Biogas saves Kenyan school money, conserves nature A school in the rural Rift Valley of central Kenya is a model for successful small-scale response to climate change, according to this article. The school cooks with biogas produced from latrines, eliminating fuel and sanitation costs while reducing harmful carbon emissions and sparing surrounding forests some 150 […]

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There’s “Flame,” But Where’s the Smoke?

There’s “Flame,” But Where’s the Smoke?

Upon hearing of Flame, the recently discovered computer malware sometimes described as the most insidious and sophisticated ever, one’s first thought is bound to be of Stuxnet. Upon discovery of that virus a year and a half ago, analyses by top cyber-security firms soon yielded smoking-gun proof that Stuxnet was custom-made to knock out uranium […]

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