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Tag Archives: human rights

Setting a Path for Justice – UN Human Rights Report on Libya

Setting a Path for Justice – UN Human Rights Report on Libya

On 2 March, the UN Human Rights Council released an extensive report (over 200 pages) covering extra-judicial killings, arbitrary detention, disappearances, torture, sexual violence, and attacks on civilians by armed parties in Libya. The report details activity undertaken by pro and anti-Gaddafi forces, as well as NATO’s air campaign. As most would agree, the Human Rights Council […]

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Iran’s Crackdown on Dissent Escalates in Run Up to March 2 Elections

Iran’s Crackdown on Dissent Escalates in Run Up to March 2 Elections

The following is an announcement by Amnesty International. (New York) – Iran has unleashed a wave of repression in the lead up to parliamentary elections this week, Amnesty International reports today, targeting everyone from students, lawyers, religious leaders and bloggers to political activists and their relatives. The authorities have launched a new “cyber army” and […]

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A Failure of Civilian Protection – Libya

A Failure of Civilian Protection – Libya

News from Libya that torture is occurring in state and militia-administered detention facilities is horrific, but should be of little surprise. Amnesty International’s recent statements assert that torture is a wide-spread practice in Libya and has resulted in several deaths. The statements further that no investigations are occurring. Add to these statements a recent announcement by Medecins Sans […]

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Yemen, Women’s Great Prison

Yemen, Women’s Great Prison

The following story (part 2, the 1st instalment as it were, was published at http://foreignpolicyblogs.com/2011/11/16/a-window-into-womens-world-in-yemen/) is that of Amal Hassan, a young Yemeni woman who from the time she drew her first breath has had to fight for what many in the West take for granted: freedom, education, pursuit of happiness. Raised in a conservative […]

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Year in Review 2011: When Human Rights “Went Viral”

Year in Review 2011: When Human Rights “Went Viral”

Many things could be said about the past year, but at the very least it could not be considered boring. Within two weeks of the new year, protests over government corruption in Tunisia ousted its long standing dictator, Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. That event, which took many observers by surprise, triggered a wave of protests […]

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Yemen Youth Rejects the GCC Proposal in Block

Yemen Youth Rejects the GCC Proposal in Block

The Civil Coalition of Youth Revolution (CCYR) announced rejection of the Gulf’s agreement which was signed by President Saleh’s regime and the opposition Wednesday in Riyadh. The following is the official statement issued by the group. It should be noted that the great majority of Yemeni are against an immunity clause for Saleh, his family […]

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A Window into Women’s World In Yemen

A Window into Women’s World In Yemen

Warning: the following is as an account of one woman’s experience; although it does highlight some major issues in Yemen in regards to Family Laws and Gender Equality it is not a reflection of the Yemeni society as a whole but rather the failure of a system to protect the most vulnerable. Amal Hassan’ story […]

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Taking Stock for World Pneumonia Day

Taking Stock for World Pneumonia Day

Tomorrow (November 12) is World Pneumonia Day.  Although it seems that there’s a commemorative event almost every day to increase awareness about various illnesses or health issues, pneumonia is one that the world should remember and take action on.  Pneumonia is currently the number one killer of children worldwide, more than HIV/AIDS, malaria, and measles […]

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It’s Time for Individuals to Demand More Action on Non-Communicable Diseases

It’s Time for Individuals to Demand More Action on Non-Communicable Diseases

The UN High-Level Meeting (HLM) on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) was held last week in New York and resulted in the adoption of a Political Declaration (PDF here).  As I feared a few weeks ago, the declaration is weak and does not set hard goals or targets to curb the NCD epidemic, which caused two-thirds of […]

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Iran’s Baha’i Community Seeks International Support for Right to Education

Iran’s Baha’i Community Seeks International Support for Right to Education

That education is a universal right is a principle enshrined in both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and, for a large part, in the psyche of humanity. Therefore, the idea that one would be barred from higher education based on one’s religious convictions becomes absurd at best. This is the absurd reality that the […]

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Parks, Parklets, and Green Spaces: Improving Health and Other Social Factors

Parks, Parklets, and Green Spaces: Improving Health and Other Social Factors

I’ve made a recent move to San Francisco, California, and a few days ago, I found myself wandering around The Mission, a neighborhood that is undergoing rapid gentrification.  Apart from the somewhat small but popular Dolores Park (pictured left), there isn’t a lot of green space in the area, in contrast with many other (generally […]

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“Let Them Eat Grass”

“Let Them Eat Grass”

Two weeks ago the European Union announced that it intends to provide $14.5 million in emergency food aid to North Korea. According to the statement released by the EU, after visiting North Korea in June, monitors judged the situation to be: “Increasingly desperate and extreme measures are being taken by the hard-hit North Koreans, including […]

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Guest Post: Egypt After the Revolution

By Atef Said I got on a plane to Cairo on February 4, ten days after Egyptians took to the streets in a popular revolution that eventually led to the ouster of notorious dictator Hosni Mubarak. I had mixed emotions when leaving for Egypt: anxiety about the family I was leaving behind and about my […]

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Rwanda, Press Freedom & Twitter

Reactions to the so-called twitterspat between Rwandan President Paul Kagame, Rwandan Foreign Minister Louise Mushikiwabo and British journalist Ian Birrell that I posted on Monday is still in full swing online. The reactions I posted then pretty much summed up general opinion about the incident with most people siding with Birrell. And while I am […]

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Watching the endgame in Cote d'Ivoire

It was supposed to be the final stage of a nearly decade long peace process. It was supposed to finally put to rest the civil war that tore the country apart in the 1990s. It was supposed to be the start to a new chapter in Cote d’Ivoire’s history, one not marked by geographic and […]

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