Foreign Policy Blogs

Tag Archives: United States

Energy Resources and Political Dynamics with Gulf States

Energy Resources and Political Dynamics with Gulf States

For years, oil has been powered our increasingly technologically dependent world. Oil alternatives are becoming increasingly popular, and coupled with the Persian Gulf’s limited supply, many governments have tried to stay ahead of the market, which forecasts a world that’s not dependent on the Arabian Peninsula’s oil.

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By Any Other Name: The Words We Use

By Any Other Name: The Words We Use

The words we use have an impact on the world around us. For people who have been trafficked and exploited for sexual purposes, such an apparently minor thing as language can tangle their lives and seriously affect their future.

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The Implications of the Houthi Coup d’état in Yemen

The Implications of the Houthi Coup d’état in Yemen

The Houthi, who prefer to call themselves Ansar Allah, or Partisans of God, hail from the Zaydi branch of Shia Islam, a sect that exists almost entirely in Yemen and make up about 35 percent of its population.

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Two Big Players Enter the Fray

Two Big Players Enter the Fray

During President Obama’s recent trip spanning China, Myanmar and Australia, he along with Chinese President Xi Jingping announced what amounts to a historic agreement between the nations to reduce greenhouse emissions (amongst agreements to extend visas and trade deals to eliminate tariffs on IT products).

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Conflict in the East and South China Seas: A Wikistrat Simulation

Conflict in the East and South China Seas:  A Wikistrat Simulation

Last week saw yet another meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) which was hosted by Myanmar President Thein Sein on Nov. 12 and 13. ASEAN nations had initially hoped for further progress on territorial issues related to the East and South China Seas, yet once again came away with little agreement from Beijing.

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The Republican Congress and Foreign Policy

The Republican Congress and Foreign Policy

In case you haven’t heard, the Republicans had a strong showing in the 2014 midterm elections. They now control both houses of Congress with majorities that they have not seen in decades, setting off the next phase of an era of unusual turmoil in Congressional politics.

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Nigeria Key to U.S. Security in Africa

Nigeria Key to U.S. Security in Africa

As the deadly Ebola virus rips across West Africa causing death and civil unrest (i.e., due to the fear mongering that accompanies an epidemic) the fate of region remains at an impasse.

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Gaza: The Failure of Non-Negotiation

Gaza: The Failure of Non-Negotiation

The renewed turmoil in Gaza — the third such clash since Hamas seized power there in 2007 — has elicited a great deal of commentary, as it deserves to do. Much of it, however, focuses on the facts of the moment rather than the underlying causes. Indeed, even the fairly numerous demands to address the […]

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American leadership in the 21st century

American leadership in the 21st century

President Obama’ graduation speech at the military academy at West Point sent mix signal about the priorities of American foreign policy and American leadership (read Michael Crowley’s analysis on the address). First of all, the central point of his speech dealt with his perceived principal threat to the U.S., radical Islamic terrorism. Many experts tend to […]

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Bruce Stokes: “Americans Simply Don’t Care About Peace in the Middle East”

Bruce Stokes: “Americans Simply Don’t Care About Peace in the Middle East”

Bruce Stokes, Director of Global Public Attitudes at the Pew Research Center in Washington D.C., published an article titled, “Americans Simply Don’t Care About Peace in the Middle East” in Foreign Policy on May 9, which shows how Americans are skeptical about and uninterested in Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations. The following are some important excerpts from his article: […]

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Candid Discussions: Eric Margolis on the End of NATO Mission in Afghanistan

Candid Discussions: Eric Margolis on the End of NATO Mission in Afghanistan

Eric Margolis is an American-born award-winning and internationally syndicated columnist. With three decades of reporting from the world’s hotspots in the Middle East, Southwest and Central Asia, Mr. Margolis is considered a veteran of many conflicts. His articles have appeared in major Western and Asian newspapers. Mr. Margolis is also a regular contributor to major […]

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Fracking, U.S. Manufacturing, and Putin’s Crimea

Fracking, U.S. Manufacturing, and Putin’s Crimea

The Russian annexation of Crimea and the continued menacing of Ukraine has given rise to a rather surprising challenge. People are calling for the United States to step up the export of domestically produced oil and, especially, natural gas in order to save Ukraine. The call is not without a logical foundation. Ukraine—a highly inefficient […]

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The End of the Road For Kerry and the Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations?

The End of the Road For Kerry and the Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations?

Starting with the Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’s signing of 15 international conventions, the dramatic events over the past week indicate that Israeli-Palestinian peace talks have reached yet another impasse. Several officials on U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s senior staff and inside the White House believe “it’s time to say enough.” According to them, […]

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Talking about a revolution. Is shale gas the answer?

Talking about a revolution. Is shale gas the answer?

Ever since Moscow decided to up the ante and invade the Crimean peninsula, shale gas reentered journalist lingo. Many have chipped in the debate, including Speaker of the House John Boehner who has argued that American gas is the sole remedy for Russia’s dominance of the European energy market. His diagnosis was that since natural […]

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China’s FX Reserves: Eight Questions on the Macroeconomic ‘Mechanics’

China’s FX Reserves: Eight Questions on the Macroeconomic  ‘Mechanics’

In mid-January, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) announced that its foreign exchange reserves had grown by a breathtaking $157 billion in the fourth quarter of 2013. That influx of reserves brought annual growth for 2013 to $508 billion (the largest calendar-year increase ever) and pushed the total amount of China’s reserves toward the $4 […]

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